Five questions with Dr. Carlin Senter, Program Chair for #AMSSM2021

Carlin Senter, M.D., Program Chair for the 2021 Annual AMSSM Meeting

CJSM is the official journal of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), and so we are especially eager for the upcoming AMSSM Annual Meeting to be taking place virtually (meaning: you can ‘touch bases’ anywhere on the planet) 13 – 18 April, 2021.

Carlin Senter, M.D. is the Director of Primary Care Sports Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and the Program Chair for #AMSSM2021. We can only imagine how busy she is right now, with only a few weeks left before the big event.

Somehow, she found the time to let us interview her. Thank you, Dr. Senter, and ‘see’ you in a few weeks at the meeting.

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1. CJSM: Dr. Senter, you are the Program Chair for the upcoming AMSSM 2021 meeting, to be held virtually, and we know you have been very, very busy with the preparations.  What have been some of your significant challenges getting the program up and running in the middle of a pandemic?  Have there been any unforeseen opportunities that a virtual meeting has offered you and the society?

Carlin Senter, M.D. (CS): Actually chairing the Program Planning Committee was a great project for me to dig into during all of the uncertainty and challenges of 2020. I really enjoy planning CME meetings and have experience doing so, so this was a fun project for me. I love the creativity involved in planning these meetings and the way you get to shape a meeting around important themes and hot topics. Planning a meeting also forces me to keep up on all the latest literature.  The AMSSM staff is incredibly skilled and experienced planning the meeting, so their guidance has been invaluable. I also have an awesome Program Planning Committee and great mentors from AMSSM who have helped me throughout the planning process, so really it’s been an honor and very enjoyable to work on this throughout 2020-2021.

When we decided to go virtual with the meeting, we were of course disappointed not to get to be in person to see each other, and to meet and honor our national and international guest speakers in person. However the virtual format does have benefits. From an educational standpoint, attendees will have a chance to view 100% of the meeting in the comfort of their homes. If you want to attend 100% of the morning ICLs you can do so! If you want to watch both the session on Knees and Running as well as the session on Hips and Spine you can do so! If you want to attend in your PJs or on your spin bike you can do so! Those watching live will have a chance to ask questions of our speakers using the meeting app, just as if we were in person. For our society, I think a virtual meeting allows more people from around the country and around the world to attend at lower cost, saving on hotel and travel. I’m really hoping that we have a great turnout!

2. CJSM: As the official journal of AMSSM, CJSM has already published (in our March 2021 issue) the research abstracts and case podium abstracts for the meeting.  We’re looking forward to seeing those podium presentations, and we’re looking forward to many of the speakers you have invited.  What are some of the big highlights you have in store for attendees?

CS: So many highlights, where to start? Read more of this post

Five Questions with Dr. Nick Peirce: The Role of Physical Activity and Sport in Mental Health

Dr. Nick Peirce, lead on the FSEM team producing recent exercise and mental health position statement.

Reduce depression and cognitive decline by up to 30% with regular exercise?  Can this be so?

For those of us ‘in the know’ in this field of sport and exercise medicine, that statement may seem understood.  But medical research translating to broadly held knowledge which then may lead to meaningful change:  well, we ALL know how rare that situation can be.  The management of recent concussion events in the FIFA World Cup reminds us of the difficulty of knowledge translation: there were instances where it seemed as if we were ‘partying like it’s 1999’ so to speak.

Reviews of the current state of evidence-based knowledge about medically important findings continue to be of vital importance in ‘getting the word out’.  In that spirit, we couldn’t be happier to see the recent position statement released by one of our partner societies, the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (UK) : The Role of Physical Activity and Sport in Mental Health.

The lead on the team of authors which produced this FSEM UK Position Statement is Dr. Nick Peirce, Chief Medical Officer of the England and Wales Cricket Board.  We wanted to pick his brain to get a bit more of the background work which resulted in this statement.  The summer Cricket season has kept Dr. Peirce occupied above and beyond his usual level of busyness.  During a gap between competitions, CJSM caught up with him — the results of our interview can be found here.

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1. CJSM: We want to discuss the new FSEM statement on the role of physical activity and sport in mental health, but first can you tell us a bit about yourself: your background as a sports medicine clinician and your involvement with FSEM?

NP: I have been involved in Sports and Exercise medicine for over 20 years having worked across a large number of Olympic and Professional sports, including Leading Sports Medicine for English Institute of Sport (EIS) at the busiest site in the country at Loughborough University, the Davis Cup team and the football team Nottingham Forest. I am a Hospital Consultant in Sport and Exercise Medicine in the NHS and have been Chief Medical Officer for the England Cricket for the more than 10 years. I have been involved in many of the Sports Societies and for 3 years have sat on the Faculty (FSEM), although professional sport commitments make this challenging.

2. CJSM: How did you become involved with this particular FSEM project on mental health – was there a large team involved in the production of this project? Was FSEM the only organization involved in the drafting of this document? Read more of this post

Five Questions with CASEM President Tatiana Jevremovic, M.D.

Tatiana Jevremovic, M.D. — current president of the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine (CASEM)

The Canadian Academey of Sport and Exercise Medicine (CASEM) hosts its annual symposium in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in just a couple of days:  from June 6 to 9 sports medicine clinicians from around Canada and the globe will be attending what looks to be another excellent conference which CASEM is hosting.

This past year Tatiana Jevremovic, M.D. has been serving as the CASEM president.  We thought it would be a good time to catch up with her before the clock runs out on her presidency at the end of this month.

In the midst of all her many, many commitments, she graciously found the time to do this interview.  We were delighted with the results, and we know you will be as well.

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1. CJSM: Where else to begin but by asking you about your year as President of the CASEM. You complete your term at the end of June, after the annual meeting which takes place in Halifax this year. What were your major challenges as president this year?  What were your high points?

TJ: There have been a few high points during my presidency year. We hired a communication advisor that has started elevating CASEM’s profile on social media through infographics and soon-to-be-completed new podcasts. We have met and introduced CASEM to the Public Health Agency of Canada as well as other organizations such as ParticipACTION, and are exploring future collaborations on projects of mutual interest such as concussion and health enhancing physical activity.. We continue to strengthen our professional relationships with friends and stakeholders such at Sport Information Resource Centre (SIRC), Canadian Medical Association (CMA), Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), Canadian Concussion Collaborative affiliated organizations (CCC), and others.

It has been an extremely exciting year, and my biggest challenge has been accepting that this role is only for 1 year. I will miss it terribly, but am comforted in knowing that my successor, Dr. Paul Watson, will do a great job. I will also continue to promote the Academy and all of its success in my new role as past president.

2. CJSM: You currently work as an Associate Professor in the Dept. of Family Medicine at Western Ontario and at the Fowler Kennedy Sport Medicine Clinic in London, ON. Can you tell us a little about your background in sports medicine and what you do with your professional time when you are not attending to CASEM Presidential duties? Read more of this post

Five Questions with Dr. Paul Jackson — President of FSEM UK

Dr. Paul Jackson President, Faculty of Sport & Exercise Medicine UK

We have returned from AMSSM18 (the 27th annual meeting of AMSSM), which just wrapped in Orlando.  It is such a large and rich conference that it would be difficult to summarize the entire proceedings.

One of the highlights for sure was a session discussing the importance of ‘exercise medicine’ in our field of clinical sports medicine.  There is a debate in AMSSM, so I understand, of whether to change its name to signal that importance — a change that other societies with which we affiliate [Australasian College of Sport & Exercise Physicians (ACSEP) & the Canadian Academy of Sport & Exercise Medicine (CASEM)] have done previously.

During this session, I couldn’t help but think about another society with which we have more recently partnered:  The Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (UK) (FSEM). It too has put the ‘exercise’ smack dab in the middle of ‘sports medicine.’

We are pleased to announce that CJSM has begun a new initiative with the FSEM (UK) members and fellows, and the journal is now freely available to them.

In the spirit of getting to know a bit more about FSEM (UK), CJSM thought a “Five Questions with the President” interview was in order.  And so I reached out to the man who currently owns that title (Dr. Paul Jackson) to find out a little bit about the history of FSEM UK,  the landscape of the sport and exercise medicine (SEM) profession in the UK,  and what the future holds for SEM both in the UK and in the wider, global SEM community.

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Five Questions with CJSM

1)   CJSM:   Dr. Jackson, you are currently serving as President of the Faculty of Sport & Exercise Medicine (FSEM) in the UK.  Can you tell our readers a little bit about FSEM – how long has it been in existence, how many members have you, what are the guiding principles of the organization?

Paul Jackson (PJ): FSEM is a UK wide body which was founded in 2006. It is an intercollegiate Faculty of the Royal College of Physician of London and the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. FSEM(UK) was set up under an Act of Parliament which designates FSEM(UK) as the body responsible for training specialist in Sport and Exercise Medicine in the UK. This involves setting the curriculum for the 5 year Higher Specialist Training programme, setting a Membership Examination to test skills and knowledge and awarding Fellowships to doctors on the General Medical Council Specialist Register in Sport and Exercise Medicine. We consult with and advise Government and other bodies on areas covered by our specialty. We produce positions statements and advice on ethics in SEM (see www.fsem.ac.uk). There are three main areas of activity: Musculoskeletal Medicine, Exercise Medicine and Team Care. We currently have 236 Fellows and 270 Members and will soon open a category of membership for doctors working in other medical specialties who have an interest in SEM. Our office is based in Edinburgh, Scotland.

2) CJSM:   We were delighted to see FSEM members will now have free access to CJSM as part of their membership.  What do you see as the fruits of this relationship?  Read more of this post

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