CJSM May 2021 Journal Club — Blood Biomarkers in Pediatric Concussions

The May 2021 CJSM issue has just published, and as always it is full of articles you will want to read.

As I gaze at the table of contents, a non-random sampling of eye catching articles includes

CJSM Junior Associate Editor Jason Zaremski, MD breaks it all down for us.

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Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine

Online Journal Club May 2021

CJSM Junior Associate Editor Jason Zaremski, MD

Jason L Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR

Anzalone AJ, et al. Blood Biomarkers of Sports-Related Concussion in Pediatric Athletes.

Introduction:  There has been a substantial amount of interest in the diagnosis, evaluation, and management sports related concussions (SRC) in the past decade. An emerging area of interest has been the study of biomarkers as a more objective measure of head trauma. Two blood biomarkers — Neurofilament light polypeptide (Nf-L), primarily found in axons, and Tau, a microtubule-associated protein necessary for axonal transport — have been studied at advanced level of sport (collegiate, professional, and Olympic athletes).

The authors of this new study evaluated these blood biomarkers in pediatric athletes.  The main outcome measures they looked at were correlations between self-reported symptom measures biomarker concentration levels.

Purpose/Specific Aims: The authors examined patterns of blood biomarker concentrations (tau and Nf-L) in pediatric athletes seen in clinic in the days following a SRC and at a six-month follow up.  A comparator group of non-injured controls were assessed as well.  Correlations between biomarker concentrations and self-reported symptom scores were assessed. Read more of this post

The CJSM Blog Post Journal Club — Neuromuscular Training and ACL Reconstructions

Needs surgical reconstructions, and NMT

The March 2021 issue has just published, and I invite you to review all of its contents.  These include original research, including the journal club selection for the month, as well as the abstracts for the upcoming 2021 American Medical Society for Sports Medicine meeting.

CJSM Jr. Assoc. Editor Dr. J Zaremski

And now, the newest in his series of CJSM journal clubs:  Jason L Zaremski, MD presents:

Christopher V. Nagelli, et al. Neuromuscular Training Improves Biomechanical Deficits at the Knee in Anterior Cruciate Ligament–Reconstructed Athletes. (Clin J Sport Med 2021;31:113 119). 

Introduction:  As we enter the spring sports season in the United States, CJSM continues to be amazed by the dedication of our athletes as well as sports medicine professionals throughout the world in preparing and competing in sport during challenging circumstances. Only a year ago the WHO declared SARS-CoV-2 had become a global pandemic.  The world entered a new era, one affecting the entire sports medicine community. That community is broad, and includes athletic trainers, physical and occupational therapists, physiotherapists, sports performance experts, strength and conditioning specialists, and physicians. Everywhere sports have resumed, it has truly ‘taken a village,’ a collection of such individuals, to get sports up and running safely.

With sport seasons pausing and re-starting to varying degrees over the past 13 months as a result of the COVID-19 Pandemic, it is of the utmost importance that we support our injured and rehabilitating athletes to an even greater extent in order to provide opportunities to return from injury without further set-backs.  With those thoughts in mind, the CJSM Journal Club will be reviewing the Nagelli et al manuscript just published in the March 2021 edition.  This study focuses on neuromuscular training and biomechanical deficits in athletes that have sustained ACL reconstructions (ACLR) versus those that have not.

Purpose/Specific Aims: The authors have 2 specific aims:

  • Quantify the effect of a Neuromuscular Training (NMT) program on knee biomechanics in a cohort of ACLR athletes.
  • compare post-training knee biomechanics between ACLR athletes and a control group.

Read more of this post

CJSM Blog Journal Club — Preinjury & Postinjury Factors Predicting Recovery in Sports-related Concussions

The new year is upon us, and the first issue of the 2021 Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine has published.

There is much to commend in the issue.  It is always difficult to pick one manuscript among many to highlight in the CJSM Blog Journal club (that’s a good ‘problem’ to have).  

This month, our Jr. Associate Editor Jason L Zaremski, MD has decided to evaluate an original research article looking at pre- and post-injury risk factors that affect clinical recovery time in sport-related concussions.

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Jr. Associate Editor Jason L Zaremski MD

Jason L Zaremski, MD

Introduction:  As we finish up a fall sport season that has been like no other and begin 2021 with renewed spirit, the editors of CJSM and the CJSM blog journal club would like to take a moment to thank all of the health care professionals working tirelessly to keep all of our athletes, patients, support staff, and family members safe. We are proud of how the sports medicine community has conducted itself during this pandemic, and we are hopeful that vaccination will allow us to put this pandemic in the rear view mirror in the not-too-distant future.

To kick off 2021 we would like to review a wonderful manuscript from a team headed by Margot Putukian, M.D., past-president of the AMSSM, which analyzes preinjury and post-injury factors that predict sports-related concussion and clinical recovery time.

Purpose/Specific Aims:

1) The authors evaluated a possible relationship between preinjury risk factors (RFs) and resultant occurrence of concussion.

2) They also sought to examine whether preinjury RFs or post-injury assessments predicted clinical recovery in collegiate athletes

  • defined as days until symptom-free (DUSF) and days until full return to play (DUFRTP)

Read more of this post

The AMSSM Position Statement on Conducting the PPE During the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic

Dr. Alex B. Diamond, co-author of the recent AMSSM guidance statement on administering the PPE during the COVID pandemic

If you’re like us, we are ready to turn the page on 2020!

Literally and figuratively in CJSM’s case.

We’ve decided to push out the January 2021 issue early to get a start on the New Year!  And we’ve got our first podcast of the, ahem, ‘New Year’ to go along with it.

There are many submissions in this edition to highlight, but today I wanted to bring to the attention of the blog readers and podcast listeners one in particular.

CJSM’s partner society, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) convened a writing group early in 2020 to give guidance to clinicians in conducting the pre-participation examination (PPE) during the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic.  The result is a manuscript entitled, “Interim Guidance on the Preparticipation Physical Examination for Athletes During the SARS-CoV-2 Pandemic.”

The pandemic has touched all aspects of our field, and the PPE poses some new challenges that clinicians must address while the SARS virus holds sway.

Co-chair of the AMSSM committee and co-author of the AMSSM statement, Alex B. Diamond, D.O., M.P.H. is our guest on the first podcast of the new year.  The other co-chair was Dusty Narducci, M.D. Drs. Diamond and Narducci headed an illustrious team of authors, many whose names will be recognizable to those in the world of sports medicine (special shout out to two of our CJSM editors on the panel: Dr. William Roberts and Dr. Jason Zaremski).

Dr. Diamond is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Orthopaedics and Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and among many other positions is also the team physician for several Nashville- area high schools, Vanderbilt University (NCAA D1) and the Nashville Predators of the NHL.

In our conversation we do a deep dive on conducting the PPE during the pandemic.  We cover issues such as venue (medical home vs. mass event), the risk of myocarditis in infected individuals, and the potential barriers to sport access created by the PPE.

Go to the statement, which is now freely available in our January 2021 issue. And go to iTunes to check out this episode and subscribe to all of our podcasts, or go to the journal’s main website to access the podcast and other CJSM media.

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