Five Questions with Katherine Dec, M.D. — outgoing president of AMSSM

A ‘pride’ of AMSSM presidents, past, present and future; (L to R): Chad Carlson, Matt Gammons, Katherine Dec, Chad Asplund

“I’m going to Disney!”

If you are a member of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), you have already arrived in Orlando, FL or are heading there, to “the happiest place on Earth”: the annual meeting of AMSSM is taking place at Disney’s Swan & Dolphin Resort April 24 – 29.

I am a member of AMSSM as well as your humble CJSM narrator on this blog, and so I’ll be going as will many other members of the journal. We are all looking forward to it.

In preparation for the meeting, CJSM decided to catch up with Katherine Dec, M.D., the outgoing president of the organization.  Dr. Dec is a sports medicine specialist and Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Virginia Commonwealth University.   I can only imagine how busy she must be preparing for this upcoming week; we at CJSM are grateful she could find the time to be our guest on “Five Questions with CJSM.”

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1. CJSM: We have to begin by asking you about your year as President of the AMSSM. Your term ends during the annual meeting, which takes place in Orlando FL later this month. What were your major challenges this year?  What were your high points?

KD: Challenges and high points were similar for the organization; it was fun, energizing and busy all year on our Board. Social media adds a challenging but high point dimension also. Major Steps this year:  3 year strategic plan drafted; beginning the branding and marketing initiative for AMSSM with the help of a strong task force and collaboration with marketing/strategic organization; bringing W.i.L.L. initiative (Women in Leadership Lead) to AMSSM.

2. CJSM: How long have you worked with Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, and what do you enjoy most about that role? Read more of this post

Five Questions with Dr. Hamish Osborne — the Surfer’s Paradise Edition

Familiar faces to CJSM readers! (L to R): Bob Sallis, Peter Brukner, Hamish Osborne, Connie Lebrun

We have on deck today our intrepid Associate Editor Hamish Osborne.  Dr. Osborne, of the University of Otago, Dunedin, NZ, is a member of the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians (ACSEP), one of our affiliate societies.

Over the last few years, he has pulled the “hard” duty of reporting from the beaches of Queensland, Australia on the proceedings of the annual ACSEP meeting. He’s here to tell us what we missed at Surfer’s Paradise and, just as importantly, what we can anticipate in Queenstown, NZ, site of the 2019 ACSEP meeting 6 – 10 February 2019.

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1) CJSM: The 2018 ACSEP has just wrapped. Let’s start things off the way we might with a patient in an exam room – with a big, broad open question. And so: what were some of the more memorable presentations from the proceedings?

Dr. Osborne: I really enjoyed hearing from Prof Lorimer Mosely. The study of pain translated so that mere mortals like me can make sense/use of it. I’ve recently extended my first consultation with patients mostly so that I can spend 15 minutes with them undoing bad images/poor language they use/ have in their heads,  much of it having been learned from us, the professionals treating them.

They come in with a “stuffed back” and leaving knowing they are not injured, just sore and that that soreness is a danger sign of trouble coping with load rather than damage happening. If only we could get “Lorimer” into our undergraduate courses and teach the new generations about this. We don’t have the problem of pain being a vital sign in Australasia but we still have some work to do.

“Ah, but I was so much older then. I’m younger than that now.” At Lake Tekapo, NZ

And then there is your old mate, Dr. Kathryn Ackerman from Boston Children’s Hospital, Sports Medicine – what doesn’t she know about RED-S?  Awesome keynote talks from her, and funny.

By the way Jim her photo from 8 years hasn’t changed as much as your recently tweeted photo (see right) from 8 years ago in New Zealand – perhaps you can come to our 2019 ACSEP conference in Queenstown and update that one with another great set of mountains in the background.

2) CJSM: I followed the meeting via Twitter and the #ACSEP18 hashtag, and was heavily reliant on your prolific tweeting.  The ACSEP does fantastic work all around; one of the more interesting programs it has pioneered is the Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP).  What is the RAP

Dr. Osborne: The ACSEP is very proud of its reconciliation action plan. It is a written practical action plan outlining how ACSEP will build relationships with, and respect and opportunities for, the indigenous peoples of Australia.

There is unfortunately a gap between traditional custodians of the land – Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples – and non-Indigneous Australians, particularly in health standards. Read more of this post

Five Questions with Brian Krabak, M.D.

Dr. Brian Krabak, part of the medical team covering the 4 Deserts Race Series

For our recurring column, we are asking Brian Krabak, M.D. to answer ‘five questions’ about his new book (and more):  “The Long Distance Runner’s Guide to Injury Prevention and Treatment:  How to Avoid Common Problems and Deal with Them When They Happen.” 

Dr. Krabak is a sports medicine physician at the University of Washington Medical Center.  He and his colleagues, Grant Lipman, M.D. and Brandee Waite, M.D., co-edited this new book, which includes many authors known to the readers of CJSM, including Tamara Hew-Butler, who has been featured previously in these blog pages. And though this is a first time appearance in the blog for Dr. Krabak, he has been an author for CJSM before — just one of the many things you’ll learn from this interview.

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1)    CJSM: Congratulations on the new book, “The Long Distance Runner’s Guide to Injury Prevention and Treatment: How to Avoid Common Problems and Deal with Them When They Happen’” which was just published. It was edited by you, Grant Lipman, and Brandee Waite.  How long did this project take to come together and what were the most significant challenges you faced in completing this project?

BK: Thank you. We are very proud of our new book.  The concept for the book started years ago, in a desert far, far away. Seriously, we were in the middle of a desert at an ultramarathon race! The editors met while traveling the world coordinating and providing medical care for long distance running athletes of all ages and abilities.  During these adventures, athletes would frequently ask for advice about issues unique to the long-distance runner. Often, they inquired about how they could learn more about preventing and treating their injury and illnesses.   They wanted a high quality and informative book with the most up-to-date information written for the runner. Though there are some wonderful books on running, we felt there was an opportunity to educate runners.

Unfortunately, it seems the publishing world had a different view. Read more of this post

5 Questions with Phatho Zondi, SASMA President

Dr. Phathokuhle Zondi, outgoing President of the South African Sports Medicine Association

For one of this blog’s recurring ‘columns,’ I’m pleased to have as our guest today Phathokuhle Zondi, a sports medicine physician, the CEO of the Sports Science Institute of South Africa, and the current president of the South African Sports Medicine Association (SASMA).

I have known Phatho for two years now, and consider her a close friend as well as an esteemed colleague in the world of sports medicine.  I met her when, two years ago, I was able to attend the biennial convocation of SASMA, held in Johannesburg in 2015. She was at the time the president-elect of SASMA.  Fast forward two years, and she is completing her term, with a body of work that is culminating with the 2017 convocation.

I wanted to catch up with her on the eve of this conference to get ‘up to speed’ on the sports medicine (and sports) scene in South Africa.  In the midst of her busy life, Phatho graciously obliged.

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1. CJSM: The South African Sports Medicine Association (SASMA) is having its biennial convocation this October in Cape Town. I was privileged to attend the 2015 meeting in Johannesburg.  What are some of the highlights of the upcoming 2017 meeting?

PZ: We’re thrilled about the Congress this year and are confident that we will continue to raise the bar as we do every year. Some highlights include:

  • Pre- Congress Workshops – physiotherapy, Exercise is Medicine and Fieldside Emergency Care.
  • More than 15 confirmed International speakers
  • Clinical themes including
    • Paediatric Sports Medicine
    • Paralympic Medicine
    • The Female Athlete
    • Sports Specific Sessions
    • Load & Injury Management
  • Hands on Muskuloskeletal sonar course

2. CJSM: You have been the President of SASMA for the past two years, and your term is coming to an end in October. What have been some of the more memorable experiences you’ve enjoyed during your service?  What do you see as some of the challenges SASMA faces in the next two+ years?

Some major players on the S African sports medicine scene (L to R), Jon Patricios, Ross Tucker, Wayne Viljoen, Phatho Zondi

PZ: Getting to know and better understand the wider SEM community in South Africa has been particularly valuable in my journey – having deeper interactions at a Governance level with allied health professionals has improved my appreciation of the multidisciplinary team. A definite highlight has also been the various engagements I have had with students and rising stars in our field.   In the next few years, SASMA will need to formalize some of the structures within the organization in order to ensue that we continue support and meaningfully serve a growing membership.

3. CJSM: Recently you moved from Pretoria to Cape Town to become the CEO of the Sports Science Institute of South Africa (SSISA). This was quite a career change for you.  What’s a typical day in the life of a CEO? Read more of this post

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