CJSM Podcast 6: Sports Ultrasound

jsm-podcast-bg-1With the New Year, we have a new issue, and the January 2015 CJSM is packed with interesting new research.

Among the many articles you’ll want to check out are two relating to sports ultrasound: the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) Position Statement on Interventional Ultrasound in Sports Medicine and the AMSSM Recommended Sports Ultrasound Curriculum for Sports Medicine Fellowships.

Our first podcast of the year is a conversation with the lead author of these two papers, Jonathan Finnoff, D.O. of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Take a listen and tell us what  you think!  And Happy New Year!

(and to listen to and download all of our podcasts from iTunes go here).

It’s July, and the new CJSM issue has published

July is already here and it’s the moment for a new issue of CJSM.

I wanted to take this moment both to share our Editor-in-Chief’s thoughts on the new issue, as well as republish a very popular journal club posting on one of the highlighted studies in the new issue: LIPUS in the treatment of spondylolysis.

Whether it’s summer or winter where you currently live, we at CJSM hope you are well and will enjoy and learn from the July 2019 issue.

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Editor-in-Chief Chris Hughes

It’s difficult to believe that we’re already half-way through the year, but here we are already with our fourth Issue of the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine in 2019. 

We start this month with an interesting systematic review by DiSilvestro and colleagues examining the outcomes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction amongst obese and overweight patients, in studies with a minimum of 1-year follow-up data. 

Several factors were examined in this review including mechanism of injury, post-reconstruction rates of arthritis, IKDC scores, risks of requirement for revision surgery, and risks of contralateral ACL tears. A consistent association between overweight status and the subsequent development of arthritis post-ACL reconstruction was found. However, patient-reported outcome measures were similar for both sets of patients apart from IKDC scores, with lower IKDC scores being found amongst the overweight and obese population. The authors conclude that more research is required to be able to appropriately counsel patients undergoing primary ACL reconstruction surgery with specific relation to weight optimisation prior to surgery. 

Tsukada and Colleagues present an interesting case-control study of the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) for early-stage lumbar spondylolysis amongst a cohort of 82 active sports participants aged between 10-18 years old, with the vast majority of these subjects playing baseball. Time required for return to previous sports activities with standard conservative treatment (including thoracolumbar bracing, activity modification and therapeutic exercises) were compared with a similar group also receiving LIPUS treatment. Amongst this cohort, median time for return to previous sports activities for the conservative treatment plus LIPUS group was 61 days, compared with 167 days for the conservative tretatment-alone group. The authors suggest that LIPUS combined with conservative treatment may be a useful therapy for shortening return to sport times. 

Highlights amongst our other Original Research articles this month include the clinical utility of oculomotor and electrophysiological measures in identifying concussion history, the effects of long-term diving on the morphology and growth of the distal radial epiphyseal plate of young divers as assessed by MRI, and a prospective randomized-controlled trial pilot study comparing conservative treatment with trunk stabilisation exercises to standard hip muscle exercises for treating femoroacetabular impingement. 

We also bring you a Brief Report on the effect of a commercially available footwear insole on biomechanical variables associated with common running injuries, and a Case Report on the clinical outcome following lateral ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction in an adolescent baseball player. 

Finally this month, we pay tribute in respect of the passing of our esteemed Editorial Board Member, Dr Bill Garrett Jr, on May 4th, 2019. As Director of Duke Health, Bill was a much-loved and valued member of the Orthopedic team there for over 40 years. As a Specialist in Sports Medicine, he worked as the Medical Director for the US Soccer Federation and as Team Physician for the US National Men and Women’s Teams, as well as for many Duke teams. A consummate clinician, researcher and teacher, he served as former President of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and the Herodicus Society, and was also a Board Member of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, and the American College of Sports Medicine. 

Bill will be sadly missed by all of us at the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, and by the many colleagues, juniors, and patients who owe their thanks to him for his contribution to Medicine in his many roles over the years. 

Best Wishes, 

Chris

Christopher Hughes MBBS MSc

Editor-in-Chief 

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Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Blog

Spondylolysis in the adolescent athlete — what to do?

Symptomatic isthmic spondylolysis in the adolescent athlete — for many of us in the world of primary care sports medicine who have a large pediatric/adolescent patient base, this is one of the more common clinical entities we treat.

I’ve written previously about some of the controversies surrounding this condition, and I have had the pleasure of seeing some of the spondylolysis research I’ve conducted published in the pages of CJSM.

Recently published “On Line first” in CJSM is research coming from a Japanese center renowned for its work in this area:  Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS)for Early-stage Lumbar Spondylolysis in Young Athletes.

I’m delighted to introduce again our Junior Associate Editor, Jason Zaremski, M.D., who is pioneering our on-line CJSM journal club.  He’ll take us through this new study and help us decide:  LIPUS — should we…

View original post 1,161 more words

Is it safe? Local anesthetic injections and long-term safety in athletes.

Is it safe?

Happy Autumn 2018 (or Spring, if you are one of our readers from below the equator). It’s that time for another edition of the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine Online Journal Club, with our regular contributor,  Jason L Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR.  The subject of today’s post is one of the original research articles highlighted in our September 2018 thematic issue on pain control in athletes.

Title: Sebak S; Orchard JW; Golding LD; Steet, E; Brennan SA; Ibrahim A. Long-Term Safety of Using Local Anesthetic Injections in Professional Rugby League for Modified Indications. 

 

Introduction:  The fall Journal Club commentary for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine (CJSM) will be an analysis of research examining the perceived side effects and long term safety of local anesthetic injections in professional rugby players over a 6 year period. Local anesthetics are a treatment modality used to reduce or eliminate pain in injured professional athletes with the goal of expedited return to play. Pain control and appropriate ­pharmacological interventions are a current hot topic not only in sports medicine but in all of medicine and society.  Consequently, this study by Sebak et al. in the September issue of the CJSM is a very interesting, time appropriate, and novel contribution to the literature of treatment options for pain control. We thank our colleagues in Australia for a wonderful contribution to the CJSM and sports medicine literature.

Hypothesis: The authors hypothesize that local anesthetic injections are reasonably safe. They predict that data from this study will reinforce the results of a previous similar study with similar authors from 1998-2007.

Dr. Jason Zaremski, Jr. Assoc. Editor of CJSM, and author of the CJSM Blog Online Journal Club posts

Methods/Design:  This was a retrospective case series evaluating the long term safety of local anesthetic injections before or during games involving professional rugby league players. The participants included players from the Sydney Roosters, a member of Australia’s National Rugby League (NRL), from 2008-2013. Read more of this post

An opportunity of a lifetime: The AMSSM Traveling Fellowship

Drs. Leonardo Oliveira, Jason Zaremski, and John Lombardo (L to R), enjoying the long evenings in Scandinavia.

In 2015 I became a very lucky man:  I was chosen, along with Doug McKeag and Alison Brooks to be one of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) Traveling Fellows.  That year, we visited South Africa, and AMSSM/USA enjoyed a reciprocal visit from Jon Patricios, one of the pre-eminent sports medicine practitioners in the land of the Springboks.

The journey I shared with Doug and Alison and so many South African colleagues was a trip of a lifetime.

The AMSSM, one of CJSM’s affiliated societies, awards the Traveling Fellowship annually. This year’s worthy (and lucky) recipients were the Americans John Lombardo (past-president of AMSSM), Leonardo Oliveira and CJSM’s Jr. Associate Editor, Jason Zaremski.  Their journey took them to Scandinavia, where they were hosted by Norway’s Hilde Moseby Berge (Chief Medical Officer of her country’s Paralympic team) and others.

I reached out to the American team to ask them how their trip went. They couldn’t have been happier to share a bit of their wonderful experience.

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AMSSM Traveling Fellowship — Scandinavia 2018

By: Leonardo Oliveira, John Lombardo, and Jason Zaremski

Drs. John Lombardo, Hilde Moseby Berge, Leonardo Oliveira, and Jason Zaremski (L to R)

As sports medicine physicians in the United States, we (Leonardo Oliveira and Jason Zaremski) had the opportunity of a lifetime—to travel to Scandinavia under the direction of one of the AMSSM founders, Dr. John Lombardo (known as “the Godfather” to our Scandinavian Colleagues 🙂 as the AMSSM Junior Traveling Fellows for 2018. The traveling fellowship is an educational international experience designed to provide a unique global academic learning opportunity to interact with sports medicine leaders from around the world. The Traveling Fellowship program is also a two-way exchange. Each year AMSSM selects a sports medicine physician from a partnering country to serve as the International Visiting Fellow. This year it was Dr. Hilde Berge, Chief Medical Officer for the Norway Paralympics. Dr. Berge, in addition to attending and presenting at the AMSSM Meeting in Orlando, FL, also lectured and visited sports medicine centers in Greenville, SC, Richmond, VA, and Boston, MA.

We have been asked multiple times since we have returned to the States:  what were the highlights of your trip?. Read more of this post

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