CJSM Podcast: Screening for cardiovascular disease in athletes — the Australian Way.

Our podcast series this year has been tremendous.  If you haven’t yet subscribed to the podcast, go to the CJSM iTunes website to check out all our episodes.  You’ll see this year we’ve interviewed Dr. Neeraj Patel about pediatric ACL injuries and the effect race and insurance status have on outcomes; and Dr. Stephanie Kliethermes about youth sport specialization in the United States, to name just two of the special guests and topics we’ve had this year.

We have another special podcast to bring to your attention today.

Dr. Jessica Orchard

Dr. Jessica Orchard of the University of Sydney, Australia, joins us for a deep dive into the hows and whys of cardiovascular screening as practiced by elite sporting organizations in her home country. Dr. Orchard is the lead author of a newly published CJSM manuscript and headed up a ‘dream team’ of experts.

In the podcast Dr. Orchard gives a thoughtful and concise analysis of the challenges posed by such screening, and how different Australian sporting organizations have managed the issues.

Of special note, Dr. Orchard brings to the attention of the listeners a series of educational modules created by the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians (ACSEP) — one of our affiliated societies.  The ECG modules are free and guide the learner in the ‘International criteria’ and the latest consensus standards for the interpretation of an athlete’s ECG, the core of what the Australian sports organizations use in their screening.

So — head to iTunes, head to the CJSM manuscript, and head to the ACSEP modules to become expert in screening elite athletes for cardiovascular disease.

Thank you so much Dr. Orchard for your time and effort in this area.

The Male Athlete Triad — Our 50th Podcast

Fall sports have fully blossomed in North America.  With soccer and cross-country, as well as other sports, come overuse injuries, including stress fractures.

I see many girls and boys, young women and men, in my clinics with bone stress injuries, and I’m sure you do too.  And I find myself frequently considering their bone health as well as their training load.  Many of us may have a decent handle on what to look out for with our female athletes — a menstrual history for instance is de rigueur — but with our male athletes, I do not have a great framework for assessment.

This has been the perfect season then to read two manuscripts from the July 2021 CJSM:  The Male Athlete Triad: Parts I and II, which are freely available in the issue.

And now it’s the perfect time to listen to a podcast!

For our 50th podcast we have two special guests:  Drs. Aurelia Nattiv and Michael Fredericson, the lead authors for, respectively, Parts I and II of the Male Athlete Triad Consensus Statement publications. I learned so much from our conversations, and I have already begun to use those lessons when I treated two male athletes this week for bony stress injuries.

If you want to check out this and all fifty of our podcasts, go to the CJSM iTunes page or scan the QR code in the upper left of this blog post.  As always, you can go to the main CJSM website and find our podcasts there as well.

And before I bid you all farewell to let you download this podcast, I also want to make a plug for following us on Instagram!

The Global Sports Medicine Community — the CJSM Summer Podcast

As I write this post, the third round of the US Open Golf tournament is taking place as is Euro2020 (a year after being suspended), and Father’s Day is about to be celebrated in the United States.  That means summer is ‘full on’ in the Northern Hemisphere.

Which also means plenty of folks are taking vacation and it has become hard to track down some authors to join me for a podcast!!!

Lemonade courtesy of Wikimedia

Mixing metaphors:  the old adage has it that you make lemonade out of lemons, and since lemonade is an unofficial drink of summer, you all get a special summer treat with this, the 49th podcast for the journal.

I am using this moment to try out a special podcast format I’ve been toying with in my head.  I’m striking out getting guests for this podcast, and so I’ll serve you up ‘me’ as a guest!

Let me know if you think I’m lemonade….or a lemon!

I’ve been an admirer of the American Journal of Sports Medicine’s ‘5 in 5’ podcast for several years.  The hosts zip through five of the manuscripts in a recent edition of AJSM in approximately five minutes.  It’s a brilliant way to get some snack bite size information and I encourage the readers of CJSM and the listeners of our podcast to check out AJSM’s podcast.

With a tip of a hat to our eminent colleagues at AJSM, I have decided to call today’s podcast “2 in 10”: Read more of this post

CJSM May 2021 Journal Club — Blood Biomarkers in Pediatric Concussions

The May 2021 CJSM issue has just published, and as always it is full of articles you will want to read.

As I gaze at the table of contents, a non-random sampling of eye catching articles includes

CJSM Junior Associate Editor Jason Zaremski, MD breaks it all down for us.

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Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine

Online Journal Club May 2021

CJSM Junior Associate Editor Jason Zaremski, MD

Jason L Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR

Anzalone AJ, et al. Blood Biomarkers of Sports-Related Concussion in Pediatric Athletes.

Introduction:  There has been a substantial amount of interest in the diagnosis, evaluation, and management sports related concussions (SRC) in the past decade. An emerging area of interest has been the study of biomarkers as a more objective measure of head trauma. Two blood biomarkers — Neurofilament light polypeptide (Nf-L), primarily found in axons, and Tau, a microtubule-associated protein necessary for axonal transport — have been studied at advanced level of sport (collegiate, professional, and Olympic athletes).

The authors of this new study evaluated these blood biomarkers in pediatric athletes.  The main outcome measures they looked at were correlations between self-reported symptom measures biomarker concentration levels.

Purpose/Specific Aims: The authors examined patterns of blood biomarker concentrations (tau and Nf-L) in pediatric athletes seen in clinic in the days following a SRC and at a six-month follow up.  A comparator group of non-injured controls were assessed as well.  Correlations between biomarker concentrations and self-reported symptom scores were assessed. Read more of this post

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