Five Questions with Dr. Nick Peirce: The Role of Physical Activity and Sport in Mental Health

Dr. Nick Peirce, lead on the FSEM team producing recent exercise and mental health position statement.

Reduce depression and cognitive decline by up to 30% with regular exercise?  Can this be so?

For those of us ‘in the know’ in this field of sport and exercise medicine, that statement may seem understood.  But medical research translating to broadly held knowledge which then may lead to meaningful change:  well, we ALL know how rare that situation can be.  The management of recent concussion events in the FIFA World Cup reminds us of the difficulty of knowledge translation: there were instances where it seemed as if we were ‘partying like it’s 1999’ so to speak.

Reviews of the current state of evidence-based knowledge about medically important findings continue to be of vital importance in ‘getting the word out’.  In that spirit, we couldn’t be happier to see the recent position statement released by one of our partner societies, the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (UK) : The Role of Physical Activity and Sport in Mental Health.

The lead on the team of authors which produced this FSEM UK Position Statement is Dr. Nick Peirce, Chief Medical Officer of the England and Wales Cricket Board.  We wanted to pick his brain to get a bit more of the background work which resulted in this statement.  The summer Cricket season has kept Dr. Peirce occupied above and beyond his usual level of busyness.  During a gap between competitions, CJSM caught up with him — the results of our interview can be found here.

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1. CJSM: We want to discuss the new FSEM statement on the role of physical activity and sport in mental health, but first can you tell us a bit about yourself: your background as a sports medicine clinician and your involvement with FSEM?

NP: I have been involved in Sports and Exercise medicine for over 20 years having worked across a large number of Olympic and Professional sports, including Leading Sports Medicine for English Institute of Sport (EIS) at the busiest site in the country at Loughborough University, the Davis Cup team and the football team Nottingham Forest. I am a Hospital Consultant in Sport and Exercise Medicine in the NHS and have been Chief Medical Officer for the England Cricket for the more than 10 years. I have been involved in many of the Sports Societies and for 3 years have sat on the Faculty (FSEM), although professional sport commitments make this challenging.

2. CJSM: How did you become involved with this particular FSEM project on mental health – was there a large team involved in the production of this project? Was FSEM the only organization involved in the drafting of this document? Read more of this post

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An opportunity of a lifetime: The AMSSM Traveling Fellowship

Drs. Leonardo Oliveira, Jason Zaremski, and John Lombardo (L to R), enjoying the long evenings in Scandinavia.

In 2015 I became a very lucky man:  I was chosen, along with Doug McKeag and Alison Brooks to be one of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) Traveling Fellows.  That year, we visited South Africa, and AMSSM/USA enjoyed a reciprocal visit from Jon Patricios, one of the pre-eminent sports medicine practitioners in the land of the Springboks.

The journey I shared with Doug and Alison and so many South African colleagues was a trip of a lifetime.

The AMSSM, one of CJSM’s affiliated societies, awards the Traveling Fellowship annually. This year’s worthy (and lucky) recipients were the Americans John Lombardo (past-president of AMSSM), Leonardo Oliveira and CJSM’s Jr. Associate Editor, Jason Zaremski.  Their journey took them to Scandinavia, where they were hosted by Norway’s Hilde Moseby Berge (Chief Medical Officer of her country’s Paralympic team) and others.

I reached out to the American team to ask them how their trip went. They couldn’t have been happier to share a bit of their wonderful experience.

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AMSSM Traveling Fellowship — Scandinavia 2018

By: Leonardo Oliveira, John Lombardo, and Jason Zaremski

Drs. John Lombardo, Hilde Moseby Berge, Leonardo Oliveira, and Jason Zaremski (L to R)

As sports medicine physicians in the United States, we (Leonardo Oliveira and Jason Zaremski) had the opportunity of a lifetime—to travel to Scandinavia under the direction of one of the AMSSM founders, Dr. John Lombardo (known as “the Godfather” to our Scandinavian Colleagues 🙂 as the AMSSM Junior Traveling Fellows for 2018. The traveling fellowship is an educational international experience designed to provide a unique global academic learning opportunity to interact with sports medicine leaders from around the world. The Traveling Fellowship program is also a two-way exchange. Each year AMSSM selects a sports medicine physician from a partnering country to serve as the International Visiting Fellow. This year it was Dr. Hilde Berge, Chief Medical Officer for the Norway Paralympics. Dr. Berge, in addition to attending and presenting at the AMSSM Meeting in Orlando, FL, also lectured and visited sports medicine centers in Greenville, SC, Richmond, VA, and Boston, MA.

We have been asked multiple times since we have returned to the States:  what were the highlights of your trip?. Read more of this post

Five Questions with CASEM President Tatiana Jevremovic, M.D.

Tatiana Jevremovic, M.D. — current president of the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine (CASEM)

The Canadian Academey of Sport and Exercise Medicine (CASEM) hosts its annual symposium in Halifax, Nova Scotia, in just a couple of days:  from June 6 to 9 sports medicine clinicians from around Canada and the globe will be attending what looks to be another excellent conference which CASEM is hosting.

This past year Tatiana Jevremovic, M.D. has been serving as the CASEM president.  We thought it would be a good time to catch up with her before the clock runs out on her presidency at the end of this month.

In the midst of all her many, many commitments, she graciously found the time to do this interview.  We were delighted with the results, and we know you will be as well.

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1. CJSM: Where else to begin but by asking you about your year as President of the CASEM. You complete your term at the end of June, after the annual meeting which takes place in Halifax this year. What were your major challenges as president this year?  What were your high points?

TJ: There have been a few high points during my presidency year. We hired a communication advisor that has started elevating CASEM’s profile on social media through infographics and soon-to-be-completed new podcasts. We have met and introduced CASEM to the Public Health Agency of Canada as well as other organizations such as ParticipACTION, and are exploring future collaborations on projects of mutual interest such as concussion and health enhancing physical activity.. We continue to strengthen our professional relationships with friends and stakeholders such at Sport Information Resource Centre (SIRC), Canadian Medical Association (CMA), Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC), Canadian Concussion Collaborative affiliated organizations (CCC), and others.

It has been an extremely exciting year, and my biggest challenge has been accepting that this role is only for 1 year. I will miss it terribly, but am comforted in knowing that my successor, Dr. Paul Watson, will do a great job. I will also continue to promote the Academy and all of its success in my new role as past president.

2. CJSM: You currently work as an Associate Professor in the Dept. of Family Medicine at Western Ontario and at the Fowler Kennedy Sport Medicine Clinic in London, ON. Can you tell us a little about your background in sports medicine and what you do with your professional time when you are not attending to CASEM Presidential duties? Read more of this post

FIFA World Cup 2018 — Will There be Concussion Miscues Again?

FIFA World Cup apperances 1930 – 2018 Picture courtesy of Dufo, from Wikimedia Commons

Ah, the long, lazy days of summer have arrived….or have they?

With a caveat that I must be mindful that fellow colleagues in different parts of the world may be experiencing different workloads right about now, I have been feeling of late both a sense of lassitude and a sense of professional, shall we say, anxiety.

My children’s school year has wrapped up — they certainly are in the mode of being lazy.  The multiple school sports I cover as a pediatric sports medicine physician have largely wrapped their respective seasons too.  There is a bit of a lull in my clinics.

On the other hand, in the larger sporting world, the schedule is most definitely heating up.  I find this to be one of the most interesting times of the year for sport.  In the USA, we are in the midst of the NBA and NHL basketball and hockey finals, and MLB baseball offers multiple games daily.  To our north, the CFL has just started its season.  In Europe, the tennis stars Rafael Nadal, Garbine Muguruza and others are experiencing the joys of Roland Garros.  Golf’s U.S. Open is just around the corner.

And, of course, in less than two weeks, the FIFA World Cup kicks off in Russia. The quadrennial event — alongside the Olympics probably the biggest global sporting event on the planet — opens on June 14 and will continue for a month, until the championship game on July 15.

Like many of my colleagues, I am a fan of sport as well as a physician.  I care about who plays, and find myself cheering on certain teams and certain players [Vamos El Tri!]

Like many of my colleagues as well, however, I am also eyeing this World Cup as a doctor, and I approach the event with concerns over how concussions will be handled in 2018. Read more of this post

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