The Male Athlete Triad — Our 50th Podcast

Fall sports have fully blossomed in North America.  With soccer and cross-country, as well as other sports, come overuse injuries, including stress fractures.

I see many girls and boys, young women and men, in my clinics with bone stress injuries, and I’m sure you do too.  And I find myself frequently considering their bone health as well as their training load.  Many of us may have a decent handle on what to look out for with our female athletes — a menstrual history for instance is de rigueur — but with our male athletes, I do not have a great framework for assessment.

This has been the perfect season then to read two manuscripts from the July 2021 CJSM:  The Male Athlete Triad: Parts I and II, which are freely available in the issue.

And now it’s the perfect time to listen to a podcast!

For our 50th podcast we have two special guests:  Drs. Aurelia Nattiv and Michael Fredericson, the lead authors for, respectively, Parts I and II of the Male Athlete Triad Consensus Statement publications. I learned so much from our conversations, and I have already begun to use those lessons when I treated two male athletes this week for bony stress injuries.

If you want to check out this and all fifty of our podcasts, go to the CJSM iTunes page or scan the QR code in the upper left of this blog post.  As always, you can go to the main CJSM website and find our podcasts there as well.

And before I bid you all farewell to let you download this podcast, I also want to make a plug for following us on Instagram!

The Global Sports Medicine Community — the CJSM Summer Podcast

As I write this post, the third round of the US Open Golf tournament is taking place as is Euro2020 (a year after being suspended), and Father’s Day is about to be celebrated in the United States.  That means summer is ‘full on’ in the Northern Hemisphere.

Which also means plenty of folks are taking vacation and it has become hard to track down some authors to join me for a podcast!!!

Lemonade courtesy of Wikimedia

Mixing metaphors:  the old adage has it that you make lemonade out of lemons, and since lemonade is an unofficial drink of summer, you all get a special summer treat with this, the 49th podcast for the journal.

I am using this moment to try out a special podcast format I’ve been toying with in my head.  I’m striking out getting guests for this podcast, and so I’ll serve you up ‘me’ as a guest!

Let me know if you think I’m lemonade….or a lemon!

I’ve been an admirer of the American Journal of Sports Medicine’s ‘5 in 5’ podcast for several years.  The hosts zip through five of the manuscripts in a recent edition of AJSM in approximately five minutes.  It’s a brilliant way to get some snack bite size information and I encourage the readers of CJSM and the listeners of our podcast to check out AJSM’s podcast.

With a tip of a hat to our eminent colleagues at AJSM, I have decided to call today’s podcast “2 in 10”: Read more of this post

CJSM May 2021 Journal Club — Blood Biomarkers in Pediatric Concussions

The May 2021 CJSM issue has just published, and as always it is full of articles you will want to read.

As I gaze at the table of contents, a non-random sampling of eye catching articles includes

CJSM Junior Associate Editor Jason Zaremski, MD breaks it all down for us.

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Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine

Online Journal Club May 2021

CJSM Junior Associate Editor Jason Zaremski, MD

Jason L Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR

Anzalone AJ, et al. Blood Biomarkers of Sports-Related Concussion in Pediatric Athletes.

Introduction:  There has been a substantial amount of interest in the diagnosis, evaluation, and management sports related concussions (SRC) in the past decade. An emerging area of interest has been the study of biomarkers as a more objective measure of head trauma. Two blood biomarkers — Neurofilament light polypeptide (Nf-L), primarily found in axons, and Tau, a microtubule-associated protein necessary for axonal transport — have been studied at advanced level of sport (collegiate, professional, and Olympic athletes).

The authors of this new study evaluated these blood biomarkers in pediatric athletes.  The main outcome measures they looked at were correlations between self-reported symptom measures biomarker concentration levels.

Purpose/Specific Aims: The authors examined patterns of blood biomarker concentrations (tau and Nf-L) in pediatric athletes seen in clinic in the days following a SRC and at a six-month follow up.  A comparator group of non-injured controls were assessed as well.  Correlations between biomarker concentrations and self-reported symptom scores were assessed. Read more of this post

Youth Sports Safety in the United States — a Podcast with Dr. Stephanie Kliethermes

The most recent annual meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM2021) was a smashing (and virtual) success.

The March 2021 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine highlights plenty of the work presented at AMSSM2021, with the publication of many of the research and case abstracts presented at the meeting.

The same issue also sees published one of the AMSSM’s most recent publications:  Defining a Research Agenda For Youth Sport Specialization in the United States:  the AMSSM Youth Early Sport Specialization Summit

The lead author of this publication, Stephanie Kliethermes, PhD, is the Director of AMSSM’s Collaborative Research Network, which has become a body which produces a considerable amount of sports medicine research.

Dr. Stephanie Kliethermes — researcher, glacier explorer

CJSM values its partnership with AMSSM. As the official journal of that society — and of Australasia’s ACSEP and Canada’s CASEM–we take a special interest in the research that emerges from these pre-eminent organizations.

And so it was a natural to reach out to Dr. Kliethermes to pick her brain on what we know — and perhaps, more importantly, what we don’t know — about the phenomenon of early youth sport specialization, rather recently identified as a significant public health problem in western societies.

Between her demanding academic schedule, her running, and her other outdoor escapades (glacier exploring it seems), she can be a difficult person to track down.  But also one who is unfailingly generous, humorous, and so very thoughtful and insightful in her interview style.

We know you will enjoy this podcast and will find the associated publication very informative.  So, take a listen and a read. You’re bound to learn a lot from Dr. Kliethermes and the AMSSM.

 

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