CJSM podcast with Chris Nowinski: What FIFA might consider doing differently in 2022

It was a whirlwind of a month that just ended:  World Cup 2018 has been rightfully celebrated as a wonderfully exciting display of sport.  Media outlets around the globe are reflecting on the highs and lows of the tournament. 

One of my favorite comments was a tweet conversation involving former English professional footballer Gary Lineker:  “Back to politics now, eh?/ What a depressing thought.’ 

Politics. Ugh.

Twitter was also the media where I read some of the most insightful commentary on the various concussion controversies that occurred this tournament, and Chris Nowisnki, Ph.D. was among the most prolific and penetrating in his analyses of the injuries to Matuidi and others.

Dr. Chris Nowinski of the Concussion Legacy Foundation

Dr. Nowinski will be a familiar figure to anyone involved in the management of sport-related concussions. Dr. Nowinski is the CEO and co-founder of the Concussion Legacy Foundation and a co-founder of the Boston University CTE center. He has been a guest on the CJSM podcast previously.

He was the perfect analyst to review what sport still gets wrong about concussions in 2018, and to review the directions where we all might consider going as we turn toward FIFA 2022 in Qatar.

Go to our podcast link on the CJSM website or on iTunes — listen to what Dr. Nowinski has to say, and then let us know what you think.

 

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An opportunity of a lifetime: The AMSSM Traveling Fellowship

Drs. Leonardo Oliveira, Jason Zaremski, and John Lombardo (L to R), enjoying the long evenings in Scandinavia.

In 2015 I became a very lucky man:  I was chosen, along with Doug McKeag and Alison Brooks to be one of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) Traveling Fellows.  That year, we visited South Africa, and AMSSM/USA enjoyed a reciprocal visit from Jon Patricios, one of the pre-eminent sports medicine practitioners in the land of the Springboks.

The journey I shared with Doug and Alison and so many South African colleagues was a trip of a lifetime.

The AMSSM, one of CJSM’s affiliated societies, awards the Traveling Fellowship annually. This year’s worthy (and lucky) recipients were the Americans John Lombardo (past-president of AMSSM), Leonardo Oliveira and CJSM’s Jr. Associate Editor, Jason Zaremski.  Their journey took them to Scandinavia, where they were hosted by Norway’s Hilde Moseby Berge (Chief Medical Officer of her country’s Paralympic team) and others.

I reached out to the American team to ask them how their trip went. They couldn’t have been happier to share a bit of their wonderful experience.

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AMSSM Traveling Fellowship — Scandinavia 2018

By: Leonardo Oliveira, John Lombardo, and Jason Zaremski

Drs. John Lombardo, Hilde Moseby Berge, Leonardo Oliveira, and Jason Zaremski (L to R)

As sports medicine physicians in the United States, we (Leonardo Oliveira and Jason Zaremski) had the opportunity of a lifetime—to travel to Scandinavia under the direction of one of the AMSSM founders, Dr. John Lombardo (known as “the Godfather” to our Scandinavian Colleagues 🙂 as the AMSSM Junior Traveling Fellows for 2018. The traveling fellowship is an educational international experience designed to provide a unique global academic learning opportunity to interact with sports medicine leaders from around the world. The Traveling Fellowship program is also a two-way exchange. Each year AMSSM selects a sports medicine physician from a partnering country to serve as the International Visiting Fellow. This year it was Dr. Hilde Berge, Chief Medical Officer for the Norway Paralympics. Dr. Berge, in addition to attending and presenting at the AMSSM Meeting in Orlando, FL, also lectured and visited sports medicine centers in Greenville, SC, Richmond, VA, and Boston, MA.

We have been asked multiple times since we have returned to the States:  what were the highlights of your trip?. Read more of this post

CJSM Blog Journal Club — NMT to prevent ankle sprains in youth soccer and basketball athletes

Our Jr. Assoc Editor Dr Zaremski — already awarded an AMSSM Travelling Fellowship. Is there something bigger in his future?

It’s July, and our fourth edition of 2018 has just published.  One of the headlining pieces of original research we have in this edition is new work from the Sport Injury Prevention Centre in Calgary, Alberta Canada (chaired by Caroline Emery, the well-known researcher and author): Prevention of Ankle Sprain Injuries in Youth Soccer Cland Basketball: Effectiveness of a Neuromuscular Training Program

Our Jr. Assoc. Editor Jason L Zaremski, MD  is today reprising his role as guest author for the CJSM blog journal club  and will take us through his read of the study.  Join in the conversation over this important new, original research by reading the article, the journal club post below, and sharing your thoughts in the ‘reply’ section below this post, or on Twitter at @cjsmonline 

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Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Blog Journal Club

Jason L Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR

Title: Owoeye OBA, Palacios-Derflingher LM, Emery CA. Prevention of Ankle Sprain Injuries in Youth Soccer and Basketball: Effectiveness of a Neuromuscular Training Program and Examining Risk Factors.

Introduction:  The summer Journal Club commentary for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine will be an analysis of the new research examining the effects of injury reduction of ankle sprains in soccer and basketball using neuromuscular training (NMT) program in youth athletes. The secondary objective of this study included the evaluation of risk factors for Ankle Sprain Injury (ASI).

Methods:  This study was a secondary data analysis from 3 cohort studies and 2 randomized control trials (RCTs) over the course of 1 season of player in soccer and basketball from 2005-2011. There were a total of 2265 patients aged 11-18 years that play soccer and basketball in Alberta, Canada. Player characteristics (sex, age, weight, height, BMI, sport exposure time, previous ASI, previous lower extremity injury with and without ASI) were divided based upon if a player participated in a NMT program or did not. Frequency between all variables was very similar except for No NMT between females (n=952) and males (n=439) and sport participation without exposure to NMT (soccer = 965, basketball = 426). Average age, weight, height, and BMI were all similar. Exposure time for the NMT group was 72.56 (70.98-74.15) hours versus 62.92 (61.48-64.37) hours for No NMT group.

Secondary Data Analysis Studies: Read more of this post

Prof. Martin Schwellnus dishes on exercise associated muscle cramping: The CJSM podcast

A panel of experts & contributors to CJSM — Profs. Martin Schwellnus, Stavros Kavouras, Tamara Hew, William Roberts (L to R). ACSM Denver 2017

Exercise Associated Muscle Cramping (EAMC) is the subject of several studies CJSM has published over the last several years.  It is a notorious problem for athletes and for their caregivers.

A world expert on the subject, Professor Martin Schwellnus MBBCh, MSc(Med), MD, FACSM has joined us on the CJSM podcast to discuss his newest contribution to the medical literature in this field.

Dr. Schwellnus is a Professor of Sport and Exercise Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria and Director: Sport, Exercise Medicine and Lifestyle Institute (SEMLI), University of Pretoria
Director: International Olympic Committee (IOC) Research Centre, South Africa.  I count myself fortunate to consider him a good friend as well — someone I look forward to seeing at conferences such as ACSM or IOC injury prevention.

You can find our podcast conversation at the top of the growing list of CJSM podcasts on our journal website. You can also subscribe to all of the CJSM podcasts on iTunes here.

I praise Prof. Schwellnus for being such a lucid and erudite speaker in this podcast.  And it’s true!!!  You will definitely get a sense of that when you listen to the podcast.  Should you want to hear him yourself delivering a proper lecture, you can, thanks to the glories of social media:  check out this lecture on YouTube on the drug everyone should take!!!!*

*[steady there:  this is sport and EXERCISE medicine 😉  We’ll reserve a discussion about medical marijuana for an upcoming blog post]

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