In the News

CFL Players line up in a Grey Cup Game. Photo: Wikimedia

The year has begun and our first edition of the 2018 journal has published: the January issue marks the beginning of our 28th year focusing on the publication of original research in the field of sports medicine.

One of the highlights of this issue is a study of 454 Canadian Football League (CFL) players:  “Why Professional Football Players Chose Not to Reveal Their Concussion Symptoms During a Practice or Game.”

The lead author of the study, J. Scott Delaney MDCM is an associate professor and research director at the department of emergency medicine, McGill University Health Center, in Montreal Canada.  He has published frequently in CJSM on the topic of concussion, including a 2015 study looking at what factors influenced university athletes to report (or not) symptoms of concussion in practice or games.

In this study, he and his team focused on a different population: professional CFL players. Dr. Delaney is already being approached by media outlets for his opinions on what the study results mean for CFL players in particular, and for all athletes in general. This very day he has an opinion piece published in The Globe and Mail, often considered Canada’s national paper of record.

One of the vexing issues in contemporary sports medicine is the failure of recognition of concussion when it occurs on the field of play.   Read more of this post

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It takes a village: wrapping up 2017 at CJSM

2017 — it’s a ‘wrap’ Photo: Marco Verch, Wikimedia

The end of the year, with its holidays of giving (e.g. Hannukah, Christmas, Kwanzaa and more), is a special time of reflection.

As the CJSM Associate Editor responsible for our emerging media (blogs like this, our Twitter and Facebook feeds, our podcasts) I am grateful for the community that supports these endeavors.

This group of contributors is far too large for me to mention in an exhaustive list.  But a non-random, representative sample might include:

It takes a village, as they say — and in CJSM’s case, it truly is a global village.  This worldwide community creates one of the premier sports journals in existence, one that offers one of the richest platforms for the publication of new, original research.

And it’s because of this village that I can report CJSM just received an early holiday present: this blog has been named in the top 60 sports medicine blogs (#8 to be precise) of 2017.

Joy to the world!

Thanks to all the readers of the journal and this blog, the authors and reviewers, the editors and the innumerable other members of the community with which we engage on social media.

Happy Holidays, and see you in 2018 for our first edition of the New Year.

Disparities in sports medicine health care

Most days of the week I see my pediatric sports medicine patients in two very different clinics:  one is within the inner city of Columbus, Ohio itself; and one is in the foothills of Appalachia, a region described in the recent bestseller, Hillbilly Elegy.  Among the patients I frequently see, I have many who could be described as urban poor (the former location), and many as rural poor (the latter).

In my care of these patients, I frequently see them (and their families) struggle with several barriers to excellent care — these range from financial issues, to issues of transportation and distance traveled, to issues of understanding related to educational levels, to a relative lack of resources at their home schools or clubs (e.g. no certified athletic trainers).  I feel at a great loss, at times, in trying to help them achieve the same results I would want for any of my patients.

I read with great interest then, in the November 2017 CJSM, a newly published, original research study: Disparities in Athletic Training Staffing in Secondary School Sport: Implications for Concussion Identification.  I found it so impactful, that I wanted to talk with the author — and so I tracked down Emily Kroshus ScD, MPH for this episode of the CJSM podcast.

Dr. Kroshus is a Research Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington, who is developing a body of academic work that focuses on “….identifying social and contextual determinants of help seeking behaviors, with an overarching interest in addressing disparities related to gender, race, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status.”(1)

I hope you are as interested in this sort of research as much as I am.  So take a listen to the podcast on iTunes or go to the CJSM website for the podcast (look for the radio button) and the study itself.

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(1) Dr. Kroshus’ biography can be found at the University of Washington faculty page:  https://depts.washington.edu/uwgenped/directory/emilykroshus

The impact of clavicle fractures on return to play in NFL athletes

Aaron Rodgers, quarterback of the NFL’s Green Bay Packers — photo Mike Morbeck Wikimedia

I love sports as well as sports medicine.  For many of us, our path to this field saw us grow from athletes or fans ourselves to physicians who kept ‘in the game’ by caring for other athletes and keeping them in the game.

I have written about my affection for my favorite professional team — the Green Bay Packers of the NFL. Anyone following the Packers this season, or the NFL in general, will know that Aaron Rodgers, the team’s franchise quarterback (and sine qua non), sustained a potentially season-ending clavicle fracture to his right, throwing shoulder in October. He has been out since — and his team, its fans (me!), and multiple fantasy football team owners are anxiously awaiting his return.  There is growing expectation he will be back next week for the Packers’ final three games of the season. Go Pack Go!

The waiting is the hardest part,” Tom Petty (RIP) has sung. And the waiting for Rodgers has been very hard for the Packers. Indeed, for anyone experiencing or managing a clavicle fracture, a lot of the frustration comes from the typically temporary but lengthy disability incurred — in the middle of an athlete’s season, a clavicle fracture can be the darnedest thing.  One is waiting as if for a batch of cookies to be done — take them out of the oven too early, you may be ruining a good thing; wait too long, you may unnecessarily be keeping your player out of the game.

With the ‘waiting’ for Rodgers on my mind, I read with special interest this morning a new, ‘published online first’ study from CJSM: Impact of Clavicle Fractures on Return to Play and Performance Ratings in NFL Athletes.   Read more of this post

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