Five Questions with Brian Krabak, M.D.

Dr. Brian Krabak, part of the medical team covering the 4 Deserts Race Series

For our recurring column, we are asking Brian Krabak, M.D. to answer ‘five questions’ about his new book (and more):  “The Long Distance Runner’s Guide to Injury Prevention and Treatment:  How to Avoid Common Problems and Deal with Them When They Happen.” 

Dr. Krabak is a sports medicine physician at the University of Washington Medical Center.  He and his colleagues, Grant Lipman, M.D. and Brandee Waite, M.D., co-edited this new book, which includes many authors known to the readers of CJSM, including Tamara Hew-Butler, who has been featured previously in these blog pages. And though this is a first time appearance in the blog for Dr. Krabak, he has been an author for CJSM before — just one of the many things you’ll learn from this interview.

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1)    CJSM: Congratulations on the new book, “The Long Distance Runner’s Guide to Injury Prevention and Treatment: How to Avoid Common Problems and Deal with Them When They Happen’” which was just published. It was edited by you, Grant Lipman, and Brandee Waite.  How long did this project take to come together and what were the most significant challenges you faced in completing this project?

BK: Thank you. We are very proud of our new book.  The concept for the book started years ago, in a desert far, far away. Seriously, we were in the middle of a desert at an ultramarathon race! The editors met while traveling the world coordinating and providing medical care for long distance running athletes of all ages and abilities.  During these adventures, athletes would frequently ask for advice about issues unique to the long-distance runner. Often, they inquired about how they could learn more about preventing and treating their injury and illnesses.   They wanted a high quality and informative book with the most up-to-date information written for the runner. Though there are some wonderful books on running, we felt there was an opportunity to educate runners.

Unfortunately, it seems the publishing world had a different view. Read more of this post

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ACSEP 2018 — Surfer’s Paradise is around the corner!

 

Open invitation to Sport and Exercise Medicine professionals to attend the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians Annual Conference.

By @Hamish_Osborne Associate Editor @CJSMonline and Vice President @ACSEP_

Drs. Hamish Osborne (far R) & Brendan O’Neill (far L) — ACSEP fellows — and guests, at ACSEP Black Tie Gala

I had a great time earlier this year at the @CASEMACMSE conference at Mont Tremblant, in Quebec, and it’s now the turn of the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians (@ACSEP_) to warmly invite you to the biggest SEM Conference on the 2018 calendar down-under from February 10-13 on the sunny Gold Coast, just before the Commonwealth Games (@GC2018). This will be the largest sporting event in Australia in 2018 and our theme “High Performance Medicine” recognizes the need to provide the best care we can to our patients whether they be elite athletes or #weekendwarriors, whether they have injury or are trying to stave off non-communicable disease.

We have a fabulous international faculty and home grown experts – Professor Lorimer Moseley (@bodyinmind) will deliver the Vince Higgins Lecture – 18 Years of Explaining Pain – Past, Present and Future. Pain and performance: Current concepts and future directions.

@DrLJLee,well known for her total body function models of pain will challenge your minds and understanding of optimal whole body treatment approaches.  Prof @PaulwHodges, internationally recognised for his work in low back pain completes the trio of excellence in the areas of pain and function in the back.

ACSEP advocates strongly for equality, diversity, mental health of its members and patients and workplaces free of bullying, harassment and discrimination. Dr Eva Carneiro will give a unique insight into her world of sports medicine with our own Dr Martin Raftery, CMO of World Rugby giving his version of the challenges involved. (Is this where I fit in the bit about the New Zealand All Blacks being back to back reigning World Champions?)

Finally, last but certainly not least, really looking forward to seeing our friends from the USA @DrBobSallis and Dr Kate Ackerman who aside from their keynote talks may also be able to share some interesting insights on bullying, harassment and discrimination.

A new feature this year will be our poster session and we especially would like to welcome new and emerging researchers to submit their work and attend – a great opportunity to fast track your work.

Special Dates:

6-8 February

ACSEP Registrar Conference – our ACSEP trainees present the best of their research to date. Read more of this post

It’s a long way from Boston to Denver — 5 Questions with David Howell

David Howell, alongside one of many of the research posters he has produced

When I now think of my friend, David Howell, I have this beautiful John Denver song in my head:

It’s a long way from LA to Denver
It’s a long time to hang in the sky
It’s a long way home to Starwood in Aspen
A sweet Rocky Mountain paradise
Oh, my sweet Rocky Mountain paradise

Granted, David just moved to Denver from Boston, not LA, but I can’t separate the melody from his journey, and the visions I have of him hanging out in the Rockies…..

David Howell PhD, ATC–and the team of researchers with whom he most recently worked at Children’s Hospital, Boston–has been one of the more prolific authors for CJSM in the last several years.  This summer, he moved to Children’s Hospital, Colorado, where he continues the pioneering research into kids’ sports safety that has been the hallmark of his career.

As lead author of two recently published CJSM studies, he was a natural interview for this, our most recent blog post and contribution to the recurring “5 Questions with CJSM” column.

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1) CJSM just published your new study, “Near Point of Convergence and Gait Deficits in Adolescents after Sport-Related Concussion.”  What would you state are the most important, new contributions to the literature your team made with this study?  And are there specific take-home points that the practicing clinician can use in their assessment of concussed teenagers?

DH: The idea of combining visual and gait-based measures in patients with a concussion was a result of an interdisciplinary collaboration. I was fortunate to work alongside colleagues from optometry/ophthalmology (Aparna Raghuram PhD, OD, and Ankoor Shah, MD, PhD) and sports medicine (William Meehan, MD and Michael O’Brien, MD) on this study. Based on our discussions, we were interested in the value and association of instrumented gait measures and vergence measures, since both have documented value for use within concussion evaluations. Additionally, both tests were relatively easy to administer within the sport concussion clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital. Read more of this post

CJSM Blog Journal Club — is rESWT an effective therapy for chronic, distal biceps tendinopathy?

I’m pleased to welcome Jason Zaremski MD, one of our junior associate editors, who has contributed our first on-line journal club article.

Dr. Zaremski is a primary care sports medicine specialist who is board certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. He is an assistant professor at the University of Florida in the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation.

Dr. Zaremski is also a member of one of our affiliated societies, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, and was appointed last year as the AMSSM junior associate editor.  He’s been busy behind the scenes on many CJSM initiatives already; this is his first foray onto the blog, and we’ve been looking forward to his contribution.  Enjoy!

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Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine

Online Journal Club

Jason L Zaremski

Title: Furia JP, et al. Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Is Effective and Safe in Chronic Distal Biceps Tendinopathy. Clin J Sport Med 2017;27:430–437.

Introduction:

This is the first online Journal Club Commentary for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine’s new initiative for its Online Journal Club. Furia and colleagues sought to determine the efficacy and safety of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) for chronic distal biceps tendinopathy (cDBT). This is a retrospective case control study with level three evidence. The specific aim of the study is to determine whether rESWT is safe and effective for the management of cDBT.

Methods:

This is a retrospective case control study Read more of this post

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