Five questions with Dr. Carlin Senter, Program Chair for #AMSSM2021

Carlin Senter, M.D., Program Chair for the 2021 Annual AMSSM Meeting

CJSM is the official journal of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), and so we are especially eager for the upcoming AMSSM Annual Meeting to be taking place virtually (meaning: you can ‘touch bases’ anywhere on the planet) 13 – 18 April, 2021.

Carlin Senter, M.D. is the Director of Primary Care Sports Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and the Program Chair for #AMSSM2021. We can only imagine how busy she is right now, with only a few weeks left before the big event.

Somehow, she found the time to let us interview her. Thank you, Dr. Senter, and ‘see’ you in a few weeks at the meeting.

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1. CJSM: Dr. Senter, you are the Program Chair for the upcoming AMSSM 2021 meeting, to be held virtually, and we know you have been very, very busy with the preparations.  What have been some of your significant challenges getting the program up and running in the middle of a pandemic?  Have there been any unforeseen opportunities that a virtual meeting has offered you and the society?

Carlin Senter, M.D. (CS): Actually chairing the Program Planning Committee was a great project for me to dig into during all of the uncertainty and challenges of 2020. I really enjoy planning CME meetings and have experience doing so, so this was a fun project for me. I love the creativity involved in planning these meetings and the way you get to shape a meeting around important themes and hot topics. Planning a meeting also forces me to keep up on all the latest literature.  The AMSSM staff is incredibly skilled and experienced planning the meeting, so their guidance has been invaluable. I also have an awesome Program Planning Committee and great mentors from AMSSM who have helped me throughout the planning process, so really it’s been an honor and very enjoyable to work on this throughout 2020-2021.

When we decided to go virtual with the meeting, we were of course disappointed not to get to be in person to see each other, and to meet and honor our national and international guest speakers in person. However the virtual format does have benefits. From an educational standpoint, attendees will have a chance to view 100% of the meeting in the comfort of their homes. If you want to attend 100% of the morning ICLs you can do so! If you want to watch both the session on Knees and Running as well as the session on Hips and Spine you can do so! If you want to attend in your PJs or on your spin bike you can do so! Those watching live will have a chance to ask questions of our speakers using the meeting app, just as if we were in person. For our society, I think a virtual meeting allows more people from around the country and around the world to attend at lower cost, saving on hotel and travel. I’m really hoping that we have a great turnout!

2. CJSM: As the official journal of AMSSM, CJSM has already published (in our March 2021 issue) the research abstracts and case podium abstracts for the meeting.  We’re looking forward to seeing those podium presentations, and we’re looking forward to many of the speakers you have invited.  What are some of the big highlights you have in store for attendees?

CS: So many highlights, where to start? Read more of this post

The CJSM Blog Post Journal Club — Neuromuscular Training and ACL Reconstructions

Needs surgical reconstructions, and NMT

The March 2021 issue has just published, and I invite you to review all of its contents.  These include original research, including the journal club selection for the month, as well as the abstracts for the upcoming 2021 American Medical Society for Sports Medicine meeting.

CJSM Jr. Assoc. Editor Dr. J Zaremski

And now, the newest in his series of CJSM journal clubs:  Jason L Zaremski, MD presents:

Christopher V. Nagelli, et al. Neuromuscular Training Improves Biomechanical Deficits at the Knee in Anterior Cruciate Ligament–Reconstructed Athletes. (Clin J Sport Med 2021;31:113 119). 

Introduction:  As we enter the spring sports season in the United States, CJSM continues to be amazed by the dedication of our athletes as well as sports medicine professionals throughout the world in preparing and competing in sport during challenging circumstances. Only a year ago the WHO declared SARS-CoV-2 had become a global pandemic.  The world entered a new era, one affecting the entire sports medicine community. That community is broad, and includes athletic trainers, physical and occupational therapists, physiotherapists, sports performance experts, strength and conditioning specialists, and physicians. Everywhere sports have resumed, it has truly ‘taken a village,’ a collection of such individuals, to get sports up and running safely.

With sport seasons pausing and re-starting to varying degrees over the past 13 months as a result of the COVID-19 Pandemic, it is of the utmost importance that we support our injured and rehabilitating athletes to an even greater extent in order to provide opportunities to return from injury without further set-backs.  With those thoughts in mind, the CJSM Journal Club will be reviewing the Nagelli et al manuscript just published in the March 2021 edition.  This study focuses on neuromuscular training and biomechanical deficits in athletes that have sustained ACL reconstructions (ACLR) versus those that have not.

Purpose/Specific Aims: The authors have 2 specific aims:

  • Quantify the effect of a Neuromuscular Training (NMT) program on knee biomechanics in a cohort of ACLR athletes.
  • compare post-training knee biomechanics between ACLR athletes and a control group.

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CJSM Podcast: The effect of race and insurance status on ACL injury outcomes in children and adolescents

ACL injuries are a common subject for sports medicine publications:  according to a 2019 study in the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, there have been 18,696 ACL publications in PubMed during the past 40 years, trending upwards from 26 articles published in 1979 to 1380 articles published in the year 2018 alone.

The reasons for this are clear. ACL injuries are a common injury in the young and physically active, and the ligament itself is the most commonly operated ligament of the knee.  The injury is consequential, both in its impact on athletic performance as well as on long-term morbidity, with a well-known risk of early onset osteoarthritis which can cause long-term pain, functional limitations, and decreased quality of life.

Another phenomenon also all too common in American medicine is that of health care disparities.  You name the disease or injury in medicine and the therapy or intervention in question, and dollars to donuts you’ll find a study showing that race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status can have negative consequences on outcomes.

A new study in the November 2020 CJSM looks at the intersection of these two common phenomena, and reports on the impact of race and insurance status (a proxy for socioeconomic status) on outcomes in the care of pediatric ACL injuries. As soon as I finished reading the study, I wrote a blog post.

I also knew whom I had to have on as the next guest for the CJSM podcast.

Neeraj Patel M.D., M.P.H. performing knee arthroscopy in the O.R.

Neeraj Patel M.D., M.P.H., corresponding author of the study — How do race and insurance status affect the care of pediatric anterior cruciate ligament injuries — is an attending physician at Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago, USA and an Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He joined me one morning to do a deeper dive into the work he and his team from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) did to bring this excellent study to the pages of CJSM.

Dr. Patel and the senior author, Dr. Ted Ganley, are both members of the Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine Society (PRiSM), which I have profiled in previous blog postsPRiSM is conducting its annual meeting January 28 – 30 and, not surprisingly in this COVID era, it is taking place virtually.  By all means attend if you can to hear from researchers like Dr. Patel.

Also, go now to the the study itself in CJSM.  And finally, as ever you can subscribe to our CJSM podcasts at iTunes or go to the journal website and find this podcast with Dr. Patel and all of our podcasts.

CJSM Blog Journal Club — Preinjury & Postinjury Factors Predicting Recovery in Sports-related Concussions

The new year is upon us, and the first issue of the 2021 Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine has published.

There is much to commend in the issue.  It is always difficult to pick one manuscript among many to highlight in the CJSM Blog Journal club (that’s a good ‘problem’ to have).  

This month, our Jr. Associate Editor Jason L Zaremski, MD has decided to evaluate an original research article looking at pre- and post-injury risk factors that affect clinical recovery time in sport-related concussions.

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Jr. Associate Editor Jason L Zaremski MD

Jason L Zaremski, MD

Introduction:  As we finish up a fall sport season that has been like no other and begin 2021 with renewed spirit, the editors of CJSM and the CJSM blog journal club would like to take a moment to thank all of the health care professionals working tirelessly to keep all of our athletes, patients, support staff, and family members safe. We are proud of how the sports medicine community has conducted itself during this pandemic, and we are hopeful that vaccination will allow us to put this pandemic in the rear view mirror in the not-too-distant future.

To kick off 2021 we would like to review a wonderful manuscript from a team headed by Margot Putukian, M.D., past-president of the AMSSM, which analyzes preinjury and post-injury factors that predict sports-related concussion and clinical recovery time.

Purpose/Specific Aims:

1) The authors evaluated a possible relationship between preinjury risk factors (RFs) and resultant occurrence of concussion.

2) They also sought to examine whether preinjury RFs or post-injury assessments predicted clinical recovery in collegiate athletes

  • defined as days until symptom-free (DUSF) and days until full return to play (DUFRTP)

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