Altmetrics

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Are you familiar with this logo?

As 2016 winds down, you’re all certainly aware of the power of social media. You would probably have to have been on a space ship heading to Mars to be unaware of the phenomenon of Donald Trump: TIME’s “Person of the Year”, and the president-elect of the USA, has achieved so much of his success arguably through his use of Twitter!

Imagine that.  Only a few years ago, I recall seeing people still smile at the absurdity of ‘tweeting’, of compressing ideas into a mere 140 characters.  And now we have the proverbial ‘leader of the free world’ ascendant at least in part because of his use of social media.

There is no doubt that Twitter, and other social media platforms (such as this blog, or our podcasts), have become major suppliers of information to the media consumer.  If not supplanting traditional media, social media is certainly nudging it to the side.  This is as true in the worlds of sports, sports medicine, and sports medicine research as it is elsewhere.

In the world of sports medicine research, the ‘impact factor’ has played the defining role as the measuring stick of a journal’s heft for a long time.  The metric has had its critics, but its importance has not waned.  I for one can vouch for that:  when I went ‘up’ from Assistant to Associate Professor last year, part of my application involved demonstration of publication in journals with a worthy impact factor.

At CJSM we just concluded our semi-annual associate editors meeting, bringing together a host of clinicians and researchers from around the world.  We are proud of our journal’s impact factor (2.308), but we are also self-critical and are looking for other measures of the journal’s role in the modern world.

Altmetric is one such measure.

Sound familiar?  Thinking you have heard about ‘alt-someting’ recently? Read more of this post

The Exercise Prescription — ‘BASEM style’

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Author Dawn Thompson (left) with her siblings, at the end of a half marathon

Readers of this blog will be familiar with Dawn Thompson, a sports medicine physician in training and one of CJSM’s junior editors.

She is UK-based, and a member of the British Association of Sports and Exercise Medicine (BASEM).  I asked her to give a run-down of the recent BASEM annual conference for the CJSM readership.

What follows is her post from the conference, with a heavy dose of a subject near and dear to our heart — the worldwide physical inactivity epidemic, and how we sports & exercise folks can address this.

From our journal articles to our blog posts, CJSM is committed to putting the ‘exercise’ into the profession of Sports & Exercise Medicine.

 

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Dawn Thompson

Last month I attended the British Association of Sports and Exercise Medicine Annual Conference – ‘From Plinth to Pitch’. This was an excellently put together series of talks and lectures covering everything from Rio 2016, injury management, the female athlete to even the medical considerations in less mainstream sports of Futsal and disability shooting.

As always with Sports Medicine conferences there was a good mix of medical students, trainees, GPs and Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) consultants. The budding SEM doctor got to learn from and meet the experts they aspire to be while the more seasoned attendees got to catch up with old acquaintances and make new ones along the way. The standout session for me was the discussion on physical activity and how you actually get someone to exercise. This is an area close to my heart that made me feel invigorated and inspired enough to choose this topic as the focus of  my newest blog post. Read more of this post

The new issue and a podcast to boot

jsm-podcast-bg-12016 is coming to a close, and that’s really hard for me to believe.  November brings with it our last issue of the year, and it is a good one……a good way to close out a memorable year.

Our highlighted Critical Review article this month concerns the subject of risk factors for lower extremity injury among high school athletes.  The lead author is James (Jimmy) Onate, PhD, ATC, FANA, from the Ohio State University.

The Buckeyes publish frequently in our pages — co-authors on this paper include former ACSM president Tom Best and current OSU Head Team Physician Jim Borchers, both of who are well-represented in the pages of CJSM.  Jimmy Onate is another in that lineage of great clinician-researchers.

Jimmy Onate, PhD, ATC

Jimmy Onate, PhD, ATC

I had an enjoyable conversation with Jimmy on the pros/cons of using the pre-participation evaluation (PPE) as a potential tool for screening high school athletes for risk of lower extremity injury.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

The iTunes link for the podcast is here.

Concussions around the globe

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Brandenburg Gate, Berlin

How do you get from Bethesda, MD to San Francisco to Berlin all in a month, during the busiest time of your year?

I don’t know — but my good friend Christina Master does.

Dr. Chistina Master is an esteemed colleague from Children’s Hospital, Philadelphia (CHOP), whom I am privileged to see at some medical conferences we both frequent, including the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) and Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRISM) meetings.   She is an associate professor of clinical pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, a prolific researcher, and a busy clinician with a focus on pediatric sports medicine.

She is also an avid runner and, it seems, world traveler.  A definite ‘must follow’ on Twitter if you want to stay up to date on pediatric sports medicine (or just enjoy her many photos of the beautiful trails on which she runs, or the great dining spots she hits on her travels). #OnTheMove may be the hashtag that best describes her!

Not being able to attend any one of the three fantastic meetings she hit this October, I asked her to share with the CJSM readership her reflections on the current state of concussion understanding from around the globe.  What follows are her first hand reports from the proceedings of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Pediatric Concussion Workshop (Bethesda), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Council on Sports Medicine & Fitness meeting (San Francisco), and the “Concussion in Sports Group” (Berlin)

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Dr. Christina Master (2nd from left) with some friends from CHOP

October is usually a busy month for concussions with all the fall sports in full swing. This October was also busy for concussions in a different way, with three important meetings focusing on the topic.  In mid October, the NIH convened a Pediatric Concussion Workshop, gathering an interdisciplinary group of researchers, clinicians and stakeholders together in Bethesda, MD to discuss the current state of the evidence in our understanding of pediatric concussion, particularly in those younger than high school.  It was an honor to present along with Bill Meehan and Kevin Guskiewicz among other experts at this workshop.  Topics addressed included Read more of this post

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