The surf was up at ACSEP 2017

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Let the koalas sleep — you won’t be doing much of that if you attend an ACSEP conference

One of the highlights of my 2016 was my first visit to the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians (ACSEP) annual meeting.  I wrote about the experience in several of these CJSM blog posts.

ACSEP is one of CJSM’s affiliated societies, and we greatly value our relationship with the college.  Two of our Associate Editors are members of the college: Hamish Osborne (NZ) and Steve Reid (AUS).

On a personal note, I also greatly valued the experience of attending the meeting. The venue (Surfer’s Paradise) was stunning — just the ticket for someone muddling through a Northern Hemisphere winter.  And the proceedings themselves — well, they were little short of perfect.  From the educational sessions to the food and social events — first class, all the way.

ACSEP 2016 was, without a doubt, one of the best sports medicine conferences I have ever attended.

I couldn’t make the 2017 edition, which also took place in Surfer’s Paradise. What was my misfortune turned out to have a pleasant side-effect, as Dr. Osborne was in attendance, and he graciously penned this letter giving an overview of the proceedings:

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ACSEP has been and gone and my promised blog post is now a thank you to all those who attended clearly our biggest but also our best-ever annual scientific conference. I arrived early, actually before most registrars as it turned out, to meet and greet and enjoy the excellent presentations from our new intake of trainees. The bar is going up and up. Looking forward to increasing research contributions from this group as they come through.

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Hi hon, really busy at the ACSEP meeting

The first afternoon of the conference was up there with perhaps the best series of 4 keynotes on SEM that I have ever heard. Read more of this post

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#SocialMedia + #SportsMedicine = #PerfectMatch

Sheree Bekker

Sheree Bekker, ACRISP

The power of social media in our field, the field of sports medicine — it has been something I have written about from time to time.  It’s something I have lectured about, too, on several occasions:  at American College of Sports Medicine(ACSM) meetings as well as at a recent National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) meeting.

I think there are, indisputably, a number of reasons someone in our field should get on Twitter, or should identify a blog or podcast to follow…..Among those reasons: i) there exists an extraordinarily flexible, responsive, and timely method of staying abreast of ‘breaking’ news in our world; ii) there is a unique way of curating the research one cares about; and iii) there is the ability to have conversations and network with peers from around the globe.  No limits in space and time to the #SportsMedicine community that exists on #SocialMedia channels.

All that said, I also think Social Media does not exist apart from ‘real relationships’.  That is, in my judgment, the relationships formed in Social Media are grounded in the chance that they can be made physically real.  Social Media alone will not replace a handshake, or a face-to-face conversation at a conference. But Social Media can be that introductory acquaintance that can blossom into a more collaborative relationship when two colleagues finally meet.

Sheree Bekker — aka @ACRISPFedUni [The Australian Centre for Research into Injury in Sport and its Prevention], aka @shereebekker — represents, for me, precisely that sort of person, that sort of relationship  I first made her acquaitnace via her Twitter feeds. Then I was blown away by a  blog post she authored after her participation in a Mayo Clinic Healthcare and Social Media Summit in Australia.  And, finally, I met her.  The ‘real’ her, and not a Twitter avatar! Turns out that Sheree is originally from Botswana, and she was in southern Africa for a visit home and a swing through the South African Sports Medicine Association meeting in Johannesburg (SASMA2015) which I recently attended, as well.  From “Learners to Leaders,” that was the theme of SASMA2015; those of you who follow this blog know full well what a smashing success that conference was.

When Sheree came up to introduce herself to me in Johannesburg, well, it was like meeting an old friend.  And rather quickly, we decided we needed to do a joint blog post about Social Media and its place in the Sports Medicine world.

In the spirit of collaboration, here is Sheree, to talk more about how, in particular, Social Media can play a role in turning “Learners” into “Leaders.”

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Sheree Bekker: It is no secret that I am a big fan of slightly obsessed with the opportunity that social media affords emerging researchers to cultivate a voice in their field. I first shared my story of how I landed my international PhD scholarship through a Twitter connection in ‘Why you should use Twitter during your PhD’, and mused about how social media may play an even larger role in our academic careers than we realize (as an aside, today I would say: social media does play a large role in our careers – whether we want it to or not, whether we engage or not – this will become evident as you read on). I received an overwhelming response from post-graduate researchers on this post – and it soon became obvious that the common theme in these responses was that it was the sense of community and connection that draws people to social media. I also learned that those of us working in sports medicine are indeed very lucky, as our field has been an early and enthusiastic adopter of social media – and it can be disheartening for people in other fields to join the conversation eagerly, only to find that ‘I am stuck in a Twitter-desert, help!

Personally, as a current ‘learner’, I have found that Twitter has been invaluable in facilitating connections. One of the SASMA2015 sessions discussed the concept of ‘building a network’, which can often be highly intimidating for emerging researchers to do. How do I approach someone whose work I admire? What will we talk about? Read more of this post

#ACSM2015

social media

Reading #ACSM15 twitter stream, two Fellows of the ACSM: Drs. Anastasia Fischer and Avery Faigenbaum

california coast

Even views from a train are apparently blissful on the California coast.

The 2015 annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine has not ended yet, but I’ve had to cut out early.  I’m sad to say I’m on my way from San Diego to L.A. Well, let me clarify my sadness:  I’m on a train heading up the California coast right now, with an absolutely stunning view outside of my window–talk about Exercise is Medicine!  I may not be burning calories while I blog, but there are plenty of surfers in the water this afternoon burning some for me.

No, I’m not sad to still enjoy a little bit of the California ambience.  I’m sad to bid #ACSM15 so long.  It’s been a great conference.

I can only give a superficial nod to all the sessions that have taken place already.  As the world-renowned Australian injury prevention expert Caroline Finch put it in a tweet of hers: “This conference size always stuns me ”

patricios gray

Drs. Aaron Gray & Jon Patricios, multi-tasking on the dais while talking about the power of social media for sports medicine clinicians.

Dr. Avery Faigenbaum was among a panel of youth sports researchers discussing a new IOC initiative regarding a “Youth Athlete Development Model.”  Pierre d’Hemecourt gave a great, live demonstration of hip ultrasound–I walked away from the session with a renewed sense of the importance of this modality to our profession, a topic CJSM has returned to on several occasions in the journal and on this blog.  Peter Kriz from Brown University gave a hands on demonstration of the clinical use of video analysis in evaluating baseball throwers.  I joined my fellow social media friends, doctors Aaron Gray and Jon Patricios (AKA @MizzouSportsDoc and @JonPatricios) in giving an enjoyable talk on the power of this—of social media in sports medicine.  The power of twitter, for instance, in curating content, in professional networking. The power of podcasting and blogging, whether a producer or user of content.

Of course, there is the socializing at conferences that provides memories as well. I enjoyed a fine diner with Kate Ackerman, the subject of a recent blog post,and Dai Sugimoto,an author of a recent CJSM published study on gender differences in hip abduction/adduction peak torques.

#ACSM15 is not nearly done; there is plenty left today and tomorrow.  But for me, San Diego is well down the train tracks.  Fare well until ACSM 2016 in Boston.  Now that is something to look forward to.

CJSM Podcast 5

jsm-podcast-bg-1I’m pleased to present the journal’s fifth podcast, highlighting the new ACSM and FIMS consensus statement on the Preparticipation evaluation (PPE) published just last week in the November 2014 CJSM.

I was able to interview William Roberts, M.D., M.S., FACSM, the lead author of the study.  I learned a lot from the conversation with Dr. Roberts.  I hope you do too.

Listen to the podcast here, or use the iTunes link found on the main page to check out all of our podcasts.

And while you are at it, please also visit the previous blog post and take the poll:  we’re interested to know if you use electronic documentation and data storage when you conduct PPE’s (a so-called ‘e-PPE’).  Enjoy!

 

 

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