Can you do a brief but comprehensive examination of a concussed patient in your clinic?

Well, can you?

If your exam is brief, can it be comprehensive? If it’s comprehensive, will you be able to get through all of the patients on your schedule?

These are some practical questions that most of us in the world of sports medicine struggle with.

I’m looking at my clinic schedule tomorrow, and I have 15 minutes for most patients; for new concussed patients I’m ‘given’ 30 minutes.

Most of us know these clinic slots are a Procrustean bed – there really is little chance we can fit the patient and their needs, as well as our obligation to diagnose and manage the injury, in these time frames.

M. Nadir Haider, M.D.

Good news, then – authors from the University of Buffalo Concussion Management Clinic have just produced a Practical Management article that promises to make your approach much more efficient when you next see a clinic patient with a sports related concussion (SRC).

The first and corresponding author of this manuscript, M Nadir Haider, M.D., is our guest on the newest CJSM blog post. Dr. Haider is affiliated with the Jacobs School of Medicine, State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo where he is an Assistant Professor of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine and the Assistant Director of Research at the University Concussion Management Clinic. Many of the readers of CJSM and listeners of the podcast will be familiar with the voluminous research that comes out of the SUNY, Buffalo center.  This work has been transformative in the area of SRCs.

Listen in on our conversation, where Dr. Haider walks us through the evidence-based exam, and then go to the September 2020 CJSM where you will find the Practical Management article itself, currently free of charge.

As always you can find the podcast on our journal website, or you may go to iTunes to listen in and subscribe as well.

Any way you read, listen or engage with CJSM, we are happy you are part of our sports medicine community.

The warrior athlete in 2020 — sports and military medicine in the era of COVID-19

Francis O’Connor MD, MPH (L) and Daniel Fosselman D.O. (R)

We have two special guests for our most recent podcast. This episode explores the impact of the novel SARS-CoV-2 on the clinicians in our world who have one foot in military medicine and the other in sports medicine.

Two physicians who care for ‘warrior athletes’ join us for this special podcast:  Francis O’Connor MD, MPH, Retd. Col. US Army and Daniel Fosselman D.O., Capt. US Army Reserve.

Dr. O’Connor is, among many other things, a past-President of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) and a current Professor at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD.  He is also the Medical Director of the Consortium for Health and Military Performance at the University, and he shares with us in the podcast the challenges of keeping a force of soldiers at the ready during this pandemic.  Dr. O’Connor like many is working through the intricacies of teaching over Zoom and is coming to grips with the impact of the virus on issues ranging from quarantine to ‘return to play’.  He reminds us that resting indefinitely on the sideline or playing in a ‘bubble’ are not options when it comes to national security.

Dr. Fosselman is a young sports medicine clinician who had just started his career in central Ohio in primary care sports medicine and family medicine when, as a Captain in the US Army Reserve, he was called up for duty.  We caught up with him as he was nearing the end of his two-week quarantine, which came on the tail of end of many weeks of service on the true front lines of the battle with this new foe:  in the hospitals of the Bronx, in the midst of the COVID spike that devastated the NYC area this spring.  His story is one of true service to patients and to his country. Read more of this post

Part 2 — How SARS-CoV-2 is transforming sports medicine

Drs. Jim Miller (ready for work), Phatho Zondi (on her mountain bike, dressed for COVID), and Andy Peterson (rocking the ESPN sportscaster look)

This is the second in a series of special podcasts CJSM is publishing.  We have been catching up with sports medicine clinicians from around the globe and chatting with them about the myriad ways the COVID19 pandemic is changing the professional and personal landscapes they inhabit.

I hope you were able to listen to part 1 of the series, in which we interviewed CJSM editors Chris Hughes of the UK and Hamish Osborne of NZ.

Today, we get the chance to circle to other parts of our world, beginning with South Africa, where we catch up with Phathokuhle Zondi MBChB, MSc, MBA, the CEO of the Sports Science Institute of South Africa and the Past-President of the South African Sports Medicine Association (SASMA).  Then we head to the United States, where we interview physicians Jim Miller in Virginia and Andy Peterson in Iowa.  Dr. Miller is a busy sports and family medicine physician who is heavily involved in the care of swimming athletes, working with both USA Swimming and FINA.  Dr. Peterson is a pediatrician who is both Team Physician for the University of Iowa and a member of the Board of Directors for the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM).

The stories they share make for a compelling podcast.  I hope you enjoy listening to these stories as much as I did when interviewing these guests.

COVID and sports medicine is a novel subject–a relationship, really, which is bound to change over the next months and years, as we begin to better understand the SARS-CoV-2 virus and as sports begin to open up.  There will surely be more podcasts coming investigating what we are yet to discover.

Head to iTunes to subscribe to the CJSM podcast or to our journal website, where you can also find all 42 of our podcasts to date. Enjoy!

How the SARS-CoV-2 Virus is Transforming Sports Medicine

You may be one of our loyal readers in the UK about to begin a three-day bank holiday, or one of our USA readers about to enjoy your own long weekend celebrating Memorial Day.

Or you may be one of our many readers in other spots of the globe going into a ‘regular’ weekend, but what does any of this mean anymore?  Two day weekend, three day weekend?  Might we not even have work to go back to, and who is traveling anywhere these days?

In the COVID era time itself seems to have changed, and it’s that broad, transforming effect caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, happening to us all, that we explore in a pair of new CJSM podcasts.

In the first episode of this ‘COVID themed’ series, we talk with two editors of CJSM — our Editor-in-Chief Christopher Hughes MBBS, Msc and Associate Editor Hamish Osborne MBChB, MMedSci.

Dr. Hughes lives and practices sports medicine in the United Kingdom, and Dr. Osborne does the same in New Zealand.  They both wear several ‘hats,’ ranging from the professional (head team physician, academic, clinician) to the personal (spouse and parent).  Both share their unique perspectives on how their lives, and their nations’ lives, have been transformed in these few months we have all been dealing with this novel virus.

I invite you to visit our podcasts on iTunes or at our journal website — this weekend, download and listen to these interviews with two physicians on opposite sides of the globe.  And keep your eyes posted for the next podcast, our 42nd, coming in rapid order. We’ll get a chance to ask other doctors in other parts of the globe about their lives.

Stay healthy!

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