ACSEP 2018 — Surfer’s Paradise is around the corner!

 

Open invitation to Sport and Exercise Medicine professionals to attend the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians Annual Conference.

By @Hamish_Osborne Associate Editor @CJSMonline and Vice President @ACSEP_

Drs. Hamish Osborne (far R) & Brendan O’Neill (far L) — ACSEP fellows — and guests, at ACSEP Black Tie Gala

I had a great time earlier this year at the @CASEMACMSE conference at Mont Tremblant, in Quebec, and it’s now the turn of the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians (@ACSEP_) to warmly invite you to the biggest SEM Conference on the 2018 calendar down-under from February 10-13 on the sunny Gold Coast, just before the Commonwealth Games (@GC2018). This will be the largest sporting event in Australia in 2018 and our theme “High Performance Medicine” recognizes the need to provide the best care we can to our patients whether they be elite athletes or #weekendwarriors, whether they have injury or are trying to stave off non-communicable disease.

We have a fabulous international faculty and home grown experts – Professor Lorimer Moseley (@bodyinmind) will deliver the Vince Higgins Lecture – 18 Years of Explaining Pain – Past, Present and Future. Pain and performance: Current concepts and future directions.

@DrLJLee,well known for her total body function models of pain will challenge your minds and understanding of optimal whole body treatment approaches.  Prof @PaulwHodges, internationally recognised for his work in low back pain completes the trio of excellence in the areas of pain and function in the back.

ACSEP advocates strongly for equality, diversity, mental health of its members and patients and workplaces free of bullying, harassment and discrimination. Dr Eva Carneiro will give a unique insight into her world of sports medicine with our own Dr Martin Raftery, CMO of World Rugby giving his version of the challenges involved. (Is this where I fit in the bit about the New Zealand All Blacks being back to back reigning World Champions?)

Finally, last but certainly not least, really looking forward to seeing our friends from the USA @DrBobSallis and Dr Kate Ackerman who aside from their keynote talks may also be able to share some interesting insights on bullying, harassment and discrimination.

A new feature this year will be our poster session and we especially would like to welcome new and emerging researchers to submit their work and attend – a great opportunity to fast track your work.

Special Dates:

6-8 February

ACSEP Registrar Conference – our ACSEP trainees present the best of their research to date. Read more of this post

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Ice Hockey & Head Injury — can we have one without the other? The podcast

I am pleased to introduce our most recent guest to the CJSM podcast: Aynsley Smith, RN, PhD of the Mayo Clinic.  She is the lead author of a new General Review in our September 2017 issue: Concussion In Ice Hockey: Current Gaps and Future Directions in an Objective Diagnosis.

Dr. Smith and the Mayo Clinic have been at the forefront of research into the prevention, diagnosis and management of concussion in ice hockey.  The Mayo Clinic has hosted three semi-annual ‘ice hockey concussion summits,’ the most recent having just taken place at the end of September

It’s probably always a good time to talk about concussions in ice hockey, but perhaps never better than the start of the NHL season  [my hometown Columbus Blue Jackets open their season tonight!]

In our conversation, Dr. Smith and I cover a lot of ground:  old time Stanley Cup drama, fighting, promising new developments in objective diagnoses, and the potential for rules changes and more to minimize the risk in this exciting, fast-moving contact sport.

The review is open access — which means it’s freely available.  So….subscribe to the CJSM podcast on iTunes, or go directly to our website for a listen to the conversation I had with Aynsley.  And then get the article itself for your weekend reading.

Mile High at #ACSM17

Speakers at the ACSM Social Media Session (L to R): Angela Smith, Pamela Peeke, Gretchen Reynolds, Felica Stoler, yours truly

I’m curious about how others perceive the cycle of the sports medicine year.  I have my own peculiar calendar, dictated by contingencies such as geography (American) and specialty (academic medicine, pediatric sports medicine specialist).

Summer, soon to be upon us, is the time to enjoy not only a bit of vacation but also ‘catch up’ on research projects and writing assignments that have piled up on my desk.  Fall?  That’s the tsunami season: sports such as football and soccer keep me very busy from August 1 through Thanksgiving.  After a holiday breather, I seem to roll into conference season and various speaking engagements extending through the late spring– PRISM (Dallas) to Rugby Medicine (Las Vegas) to IOC Prevention (Monaco) to AMSSM (San Diego) to, now, ACSM.

To be sure, I’m certainly in the place where I could conduct a survey getting the ‘seasonal perspective’ of hundreds of people from around the globe and of various specialties: the 64th ACSM Annual Meeting (and 8th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine) is a huge affair, renowned for its depth and breadth.  This is the place where I can connect with folks from South Africa to Down Under, and posit collaborative ideas to professionals from athletic trainers to exercise physiologists. I am always blown away by the size of the affair.

These conferences are the places to make new friends, re-connect with established colleagues; they are the places to share a handshake or a hug, share a meal — make the physical connections upon which all true relationships are based.  I celebrate the power of social media, as many of you know, but I see it primarily as the way to facilitate deeper connections–not in the virtual world, but in real life.

And so I felt privileged to kick off #ACSM17 with a session on social media, one shared with both established and new friends: Pamela Peeke, Angela Smith, Felicia Stoler, Gretchen Reynolds.  If you don’t know them, follow them on Twitter, and then introduce yourself if you see them on the ground here in Denver. I felt privileged, as well, to interact with so many in the audience, who asked probing questions and ‘hung around’ for an hour or so after the session.

I landed 24 hours ago. I haven’t hiked the Rockies (yet) and I haven’t indulged in Colorado-legal herbal gummies (yet?), but I’m already feeling a mile high.

I hope you are, likewise, feeling the positive vibe here in Denver.  Share your stories on social media with the hashtag #ACSM17 and promote that vibe.  Then go say hi to an ACSM member you only know on social media. If you see me lurking in some symposium or colloquium, come say hi!  We can always do a selfie!

Enjoy the conference.

Military Medicine — AMSSM 2017, San Diego

Drs. Eric Schoomaker, Matthew Gammons, and Francis O’Connor (L to R), at the Military Medicine session #AMSSM17

I have been in San Diego at the 2017 American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) annual meeting.  There is always so much going on that I sometimes wish I could clone myself — doing so I could go to simultaneous meetings, hit every session on the program, etc.

Well, the second best thing to cloning — get on social media.

An AMSSM colleague, Dr. Devin McFadden, reached out to me on Twitter about a black hole in my #AMSSM17 social media feed.  I had not yet made any mention of Session #2 on Tuesday, “Military Medicine — Lessons Learned.”  My neglect to mention this session had reflected my failure to attend the session: I had conflicting obligations (hence, the need for a clone).

I am grateful, then, to Dr. McFadden for stepping up to give this overview of what was a very well-received session.  Thanks Devin for following @cjsmonline on Twitter, and stepping up to author this blog post!

_________________________________________________

Major Devin McFadden, M.D.

The United States Military is the world’s largest athletic team, composed of a diverse group of individuals unified in mission to defend the Constitution. While the physical demands vary by job, each Soldier, Sailor, Airman or Marine must be capable of responding to fire, helping to evacuate wounded compatriots, and passing a biannual physical fitness test.

The second session of the AMSSM meeting focused on the military athlete. Colonel Missy Givens, United States Army (USA), led off with an update on Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs), an investigational new drug with potential to aid in the development of lean body mass. Already banned by WADA, potential benefit remains for the American Warfighter, where the trophy at the end of the day is sometimes life or death. The jury is still out on the long-term safety and efficacy, and despite their regulation by the FDA, they’re still being illegally marketed as nutraceuticals, so be aware.

Colonel Anthony Beutler, United States Air Force (USAF), shared that noncombat musculoskeletal issues are the leading cause of lost productivity in the Military, accounting for 1.6 million encounters annually, and the top cause of disability for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Read more of this post

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