ECOSEP in Dubai

The Burj Khalifa, the tallest structure in the world — among the dazzling sights in Dubai

Our intrepid Junior Associate Editor, Dawn Thompson, has been busy not only with her training but also her travels:  she recently attended the ECOSEP Congress in Dubai, where she was Tweeting her thoughts in real time.  At last having the chance to catch her breath in between the demands of the registrar’s life, she shares with us a post on the congress’ proceedings.

____________________________________________

If you are a follower of CJSM on twitter you may recall that back in December I attended the 5th Congress of the European College of Sports and Exercise Physicians (ECOSEP) in Association with FIFA in Dubai. Somehow it’s now a new year and January is already behind us – if only there were a magic button to stop time and give me a few extra hours in each day! Now, with a few quiet moments to myself’ I wanted to reflect on what was a great conference with plenty on offer for anyone involved in Sports and Exercise Medicine.

This was the first International Sports Medicine Conference held in Dubai, with experts from around the world meeting at this central hub.  During the congress one speaker described it as a huge step forward for the future of Sports Medicine in Dubai: a country in which sports physicians normally have to travel to other continents to get the opportunity to learn from leaders in the field. The event was held at Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, and there was a real sense of pride from all the staff who had worked tirelessly to make it a success. With the FIFA Medical Centre of Excellence already based in Dubai, I really hope the success of this event will prompt more organisations to consider Dubai when looking for a central location for a worldwide conference.

Dr. Thompson at the podium, ECOSEP Dubai

It was also the first ECOSEP Congress to hold a careers talk and discussion of trainee opportunities as well as a junior doctors workshop – run by myself as part of the ECOSEP Junior Doctors Committee. This was a chance for trainees to ask questions on SEM in a low-key environment and learn more about this important specialty. Juniors are the future of the specialty, and ECOSEP prides itself on helping to nurture and develop young doctors who will carry forth the work of SEM. Read more of this post

Advertisements

“Primary Care for Sweaty People”

Dr. Carl Stanitski with wife & equestrian athlete, Debbie

I am fortunate to be spending my weekend in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, where I am attending the 5th Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRiSM) Society Meeting.  This meeting is becoming a major fixture on the pediatric sports medicine calendar, and I have gained so much by joining this organization and attending the proceedings over the last few years.  If you specialize in pediatric sports medicine, the dates January 24 – 26 2019 (next PRISM meeting in Atlanta, Georgia) should be circled on your calendar.

Among the highlights of the meeting was a keynote talk by Dr. Carl Stanitski, Emeritus Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Pediatrics at the Medical University of South Carolina.  He, along with other legends like Dr. Lyle Micheli and Dr. Jim Andrews, was a pioneer in pediatric sports medicine in the 1970’s when, as he described it, the initial work being done in this field was derided as ‘primary care for sweaty people.’

My, how this field has grown.  In the USA, the advanced, fellowship training in this discipline has exploded in both the primary care and orthopaedic surgery worlds.In the primary care world alone, there are > 200 programs in operation

Twenty-five years ago, when the field was a lot smaller, Dr. Stanitski and others were already sending up the alarms over increasing sports injury rates seen in young athletes — check out this vintage New York Times article from 1992. The article notes:  “They attribute the rise in such so-called overuse injuries to intensive sports training programs for young children, longer playing seasons and specialty sports camps in which children may spend hours lobbing balls on a tennis court or throwing hundreds of pitches each day.”

Plus ça change….the more things change, they more they stay the same.  These are precisely the issues we still face, 25+ years down the road.  That same sentence in the NY Times could be written today.

CJSM and other journals (JATA, BJSM, AJSM, Sports Health) play major roles in publishing and disseminating the research on the diagnosis, management, treatment and prevention of pediatric sports injuries.  A cursory review of the pages of CJSM over the last few years reveals publications related to pediatric concussions , overuse injuries, and training.

What I walk away from this meeting with, more than ever, is the awareness of how much more we need to go in terms of knowledge translation.  If 25 years ago the leaders in this field were already noting a skyrocketing injury rate, and if there has been a wealth of increasing research in this area, why has the problem only seemed to worsen?

The issue of knowledge translation — of taking the information we researchers produce and we journals publish — is near and dear to the collective hearts of the CJSM editorial board.  As professionals we have to start getting the rubber to meet the road.  One of the reasons why we are so passionate at CJSM about using social media is our goal to spread knowledge widely, to get it in front of the people who can put this into practice.

Join us in this quest by following us on Twitter and Facebook and subscribing to our iTunes podcast feed.

ACSEP 2018 — Surfer’s Paradise is around the corner!

 

Open invitation to Sport and Exercise Medicine professionals to attend the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians Annual Conference.

By @Hamish_Osborne Associate Editor @CJSMonline and Vice President @ACSEP_

Drs. Hamish Osborne (far R) & Brendan O’Neill (far L) — ACSEP fellows — and guests, at ACSEP Black Tie Gala

I had a great time earlier this year at the @CASEMACMSE conference at Mont Tremblant, in Quebec, and it’s now the turn of the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians (@ACSEP_) to warmly invite you to the biggest SEM Conference on the 2018 calendar down-under from February 10-13 on the sunny Gold Coast, just before the Commonwealth Games (@GC2018). This will be the largest sporting event in Australia in 2018 and our theme “High Performance Medicine” recognizes the need to provide the best care we can to our patients whether they be elite athletes or #weekendwarriors, whether they have injury or are trying to stave off non-communicable disease.

We have a fabulous international faculty and home grown experts – Professor Lorimer Moseley (@bodyinmind) will deliver the Vince Higgins Lecture – 18 Years of Explaining Pain – Past, Present and Future. Pain and performance: Current concepts and future directions.

@DrLJLee,well known for her total body function models of pain will challenge your minds and understanding of optimal whole body treatment approaches.  Prof @PaulwHodges, internationally recognised for his work in low back pain completes the trio of excellence in the areas of pain and function in the back.

ACSEP advocates strongly for equality, diversity, mental health of its members and patients and workplaces free of bullying, harassment and discrimination. Dr Eva Carneiro will give a unique insight into her world of sports medicine with our own Dr Martin Raftery, CMO of World Rugby giving his version of the challenges involved. (Is this where I fit in the bit about the New Zealand All Blacks being back to back reigning World Champions?)

Finally, last but certainly not least, really looking forward to seeing our friends from the USA @DrBobSallis and Dr Kate Ackerman who aside from their keynote talks may also be able to share some interesting insights on bullying, harassment and discrimination.

A new feature this year will be our poster session and we especially would like to welcome new and emerging researchers to submit their work and attend – a great opportunity to fast track your work.

Special Dates:

6-8 February

ACSEP Registrar Conference – our ACSEP trainees present the best of their research to date. Read more of this post

Ice Hockey & Head Injury — can we have one without the other? The podcast

I am pleased to introduce our most recent guest to the CJSM podcast: Aynsley Smith, RN, PhD of the Mayo Clinic.  She is the lead author of a new General Review in our September 2017 issue: Concussion In Ice Hockey: Current Gaps and Future Directions in an Objective Diagnosis.

Dr. Smith and the Mayo Clinic have been at the forefront of research into the prevention, diagnosis and management of concussion in ice hockey.  The Mayo Clinic has hosted three semi-annual ‘ice hockey concussion summits,’ the most recent having just taken place at the end of September

It’s probably always a good time to talk about concussions in ice hockey, but perhaps never better than the start of the NHL season  [my hometown Columbus Blue Jackets open their season tonight!]

In our conversation, Dr. Smith and I cover a lot of ground:  old time Stanley Cup drama, fighting, promising new developments in objective diagnoses, and the potential for rules changes and more to minimize the risk in this exciting, fast-moving contact sport.

The review is open access — which means it’s freely available.  So….subscribe to the CJSM podcast on iTunes, or go directly to our website for a listen to the conversation I had with Aynsley.  And then get the article itself for your weekend reading.

%d bloggers like this: