IOC Injury Prevention Conference, Monaco

The setting for IOC Injury Prevention Conference, photo Osman Ahmed

Where do I begin?

The IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury and Illness in Sport took place in Monaco a couple of weeks ago (16 – 18 March).

It was one of the best conferences I have ever attended.

Drawing from clinicians across the globe, the conference packed in ‘not-to-be-missed’ sessions over the course of the three days.  The issues ranged from prevention of ACL injuries to the best treatment of tendinopathies; preventing sudden cardiac death to addressing the scourge of physical and sexual abuse in sports.

South African friends (L to R): Jon Patricios, Ross Tucker, Wayne Viljoen, Phatho Zondi

The lecturers were an impressive array of clinicians, many of whose names will be familiar to readers of this CJSM blog or the journal itself: Roald Bahr organized the proceedings and talked about the challenges of screening for athletes at risk of injury; past AMSSM presidents Jonathan Drezner and Cindy Chang gave keynote addresses, as did the esteemed Willem van Mechelen; Osman Ahmed and a panel of others gave a very informative presentation on the uses of social media in sports medicine.  The list goes on.

I can’t do justice to the full conference, if only because of the necessary limitation of ‘concurrent sessions’ — with so much content to cover, the organizers understandably needed to schedule sessions aside from the keynote speeches concurrently.  How to choose when there may be two or three talks one wants to see at the same time? Read more of this post

The surf was up at ACSEP 2017

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Let the koalas sleep — you won’t be doing much of that if you attend an ACSEP conference

One of the highlights of my 2016 was my first visit to the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians (ACSEP) annual meeting.  I wrote about the experience in several of these CJSM blog posts.

ACSEP is one of CJSM’s affiliated societies, and we greatly value our relationship with the college.  Two of our Associate Editors are members of the college: Hamish Osborne (NZ) and Steve Reid (AUS).

On a personal note, I also greatly valued the experience of attending the meeting. The venue (Surfer’s Paradise) was stunning — just the ticket for someone muddling through a Northern Hemisphere winter.  And the proceedings themselves — well, they were little short of perfect.  From the educational sessions to the food and social events — first class, all the way.

ACSEP 2016 was, without a doubt, one of the best sports medicine conferences I have ever attended.

I couldn’t make the 2017 edition, which also took place in Surfer’s Paradise. What was my misfortune turned out to have a pleasant side-effect, as Dr. Osborne was in attendance, and he graciously penned this letter giving an overview of the proceedings:

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ACSEP has been and gone and my promised blog post is now a thank you to all those who attended clearly our biggest but also our best-ever annual scientific conference. I arrived early, actually before most registrars as it turned out, to meet and greet and enjoy the excellent presentations from our new intake of trainees. The bar is going up and up. Looking forward to increasing research contributions from this group as they come through.

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Hi hon, really busy at the ACSEP meeting

The first afternoon of the conference was up there with perhaps the best series of 4 keynotes on SEM that I have ever heard. Read more of this post

PRiSM 2017 — Dallas

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Dr. Jim Andrews, one of the pioneers of pediatric sports medicine, gives the keynote address at PRiSM 2017, Dallas photo: Kevin Ford

The last time we wrote about the Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine Society (PRiSM) we were in sunny San Diego.  This year’s annual meeting took place in another sunny, albeit slightly cooler, locale:  Dallas.

PRiSM is a relatively young society, but one which is up and coming.  There were 250+ attendees at this year’s meeting, the 4th annual gathering.  What makes this organization special is its focus and membership:  1) its focus is pediatric sports medicine research; 2) its membership is multidisciplinary, drawing from physicians, surgeons, physical therapists, athletic trainers and radiologists.  One of the speakers this year, in fact, came from the world of veterinary medicine: Cathy Carlson of the Univ. of Minnesota gave several interesting talks on aspects of osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), focusing on the animal models (swine, caprine) she uses in her research.  Her insights into the early development of OCD were among the most powerful, I thought, of the conference.

The keynote conference was delivered by a true pioneer in the field:  the world-renowned Dr. Jim Andrews, from the Andrews Sports Institute.  He bemoaned the epidemic of pediatric sports injuries and spent time identifying many of the factors contributing to this important public health issue.  At the same time, he described some of the success stories out there — models for how we can improve injury prevention in our young athletes.  These include the @safekids initiative he is involved with.  I would add MomsTeam Institute to any list of such safety initiatives.  This is the non-profit youth sports safety group I am involved with.

[on a side note — I am presenting research that MomsTeam has done, along with Executive Director Brooke de Lench, at the IOC World Conference on Prevention of Injury & Illness in Sport in Monaco in March — expect posts a plenty coming from that conference]

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David Howell, of Boston Children’s Sports Medicine, wins the best scientific poster of PRiSM 2017. Photo: Greg Myer

The faculty at PRiSM 2017 was simply stellar, including several who have graced the pages of our journal and our blog: Read more of this post

PRiSM — An Acronym to Know

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Drs. Min Kocher (L) Boston Children’s Hospital & Hank Chambers (R) Rady Children’s Hospital

I’m just wrapping up a productive, educational, and enjoyable few days in San Diego, where I attended the 3rd Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Research in Sports Medicine (PRISM).unnamed

Don’t know that acronym?  I suspect you’ll be hearing it more frequently over the next several years.

The brainchild of Hank Chambers, pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, PRISM aspires to join the forces of several stakeholders and raise the bar in terms of research in pediatric sports medicine.  It brings together primary care sports medicine physicians, orthopaedic surgeons, athletic trainers, physical therapists and musculoskeletal radiolgists.

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Things got heated up between some of the presenters at PRISM: ‘in the ring’ were Drs. d’Hemecourt (L) and Minor (R)–debating the relative merits of bracing in spondylolysis

Dr. Chambers just turned over the president’s reins to Mininder Kocher, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Boston Children’s Hospital.  Dr. Kocher must have called in the chips on the folks he knows from Boston Children’s, as a great number of the speakers at PRISM have had (past/present) some affiliation with that institution.  A short list of these presenters, all of whom have been authors at some time in the pages of CJSM, include:  Andrea Stracciolini, Lyle Micheli, Pierre d’Hemecourt, Kate Ackerman, Anthony Luke and Dai Sugimoto.  And Benton Heyworth presided over all as the head of the programming committee.

It was a pleasure seeing these folks, as they are like family (I trained at Boston Children’s too).  And it was great seeing other friends as well, like Andrew Gregory (Nashville), Greg Canty (Kansas City) and Greg Myer (Cincinnati).  But it was a special pleasure, and a unique feature of these sorts of meetings, to make the acquaintance of folks whose names I have heard on several different occasions but had heretofore never met.  Christina Master of Children’s Hospital, Philadelphia for instance.  She gave a great talk on clinical tools in the evaluation of pediatric sports related concussions and was tweeting up a storm during the entire conference.

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Greg Myer of Cincinnati Children’s, fielding questions after his talk on return to play post ACL reconstruction.

I found it particularly inspiring to hear the updates from orthopedic colleagues on multi-center trials looking at important injuries in the pediatric athlete:  ranging from knee OCD (the ‘ROCK’ study) to ACL reconstructions (the ‘PLUTO’ study)–I am really looking forward to the results coming from these studies, as they are sure to affect the clinical management of so many patients I serve in the future.

Finally, there was San Diego–a bit of sun and warmth in the middle of winter!  I swam in an outdoor pool three days in a row–I haven’t enjoyed that pleasure in four months.

I lacked for nothing here at PRISM–I gained in knowledge, friendship, and Vitamin D.  Who could ask for more?  I’ve already got the meeting in 2017 (to take place in Dallas) on my calendar–I hope to see you there too!

 

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