CJSM Podcast with Dr. William Meehan — long-term quality-of-life benefits for collegiate female athletes

Dr. William Meehan (R) and yours truly (L) in that oh so 2020 virtual space

CJSM’s November 2020 issue — the last of this unprecedented calendar year — contains many many interesting research studies.

One of the studies was the subject of our most recent blog post journal club.

I enjoyed that submission so much that I thought I would ‘ring’ the authors and see if they could join me on a podcast.

Corresponding author Dr. William (Bill) Meehan kindly set aside time from his busy schedule to share his thoughts on this study: Stracciolini A, et al. Female Sport Participation Effect on Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life,

Dr. Meehan has been a regular at CJSM — here in the blog, on a previous CJSM podcast, and most especially in the journal itself.  He is a prolific author.

He is also a friend and trusted colleague, whom I met a long time ago when he and I both completed our sports medicine fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital. God bless him, he always responds to that hook of friendship when I call him and need some collegial advice!

In this new study, he and the team of authors led by Dr. Andrea Stracciolini looked at a cohort of women in their 40’s to 70’s who have previously participated as athletes in college at NCAA DIII level institutions.

In our conversation Dr. Meehan covers a wide variety of subjects:  what are DIII institutions, what is Title IX, how does college sport participation associate with long-term QOL measures, and more. 

Check out and subscribe to our podcasts on iTunes or go to the media tab on our main CJSM web page. And check out the study itself in our November 2020 issue. Any way you engage with CJSM, we’re happy to have you.

What are the long-term health-related QOL effects for women participating in college sports

CJSM Associate Editor Jason Zaremski, MD (center) with colleagues at Florida HS football game with that 2020 look

Online Journal Club November 2020

Jason L Zaremski, MD

Title: Stracciolini A, et al. Female Sport Participation Effect on Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life, CJSM: November 2020 – Volume 30 – Issue 6 – p 526-532 doi: 10.1097/JSM.0000000000000645

Introduction:  As we turn the corner on a unique fall sports season in the United States and around the world, we as a sports medicine community continue to find ourselves facing innumerable COVID-19 related challenges which must be overcome as we promote safe participation in sport. There is a substantial body of research which demonstrates that participation in sport improves confidence, lowers rates of depression, and improves sense of self and self-confidence. During this pandemic, we are more than ever in need of all these sports-related quality of life outcomes.

In this original research from the Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention and other centers (including four colleges), the authors do a deep dive into long-term quality of life measures in female athletes.  As the authors highlight, female athletes who participate in sports are less likely to join gangs or use drugs, and are less likely to have unprotected sex or an unintended pregnancy than non-athletes. Nearly fifty years after the passage of Title IX in 1972, in the midst of a global pandemic none of us have ever faced, the November CJSM Journal Club has chosen to highlight this wonderful manuscript on how participation in sport by females in college can potentially impact long term health quality of life measures. Read more of this post

Can you do a brief but comprehensive examination of a concussed patient in your clinic?

Well, can you?

If your exam is brief, can it be comprehensive? If it’s comprehensive, will you be able to get through all of the patients on your schedule?

These are some practical questions that most of us in the world of sports medicine struggle with.

I’m looking at my clinic schedule tomorrow, and I have 15 minutes for most patients; for new concussed patients I’m ‘given’ 30 minutes.

Most of us know these clinic slots are a Procrustean bed – there really is little chance we can fit the patient and their needs, as well as our obligation to diagnose and manage the injury, in these time frames.

M. Nadir Haider, M.D.

Good news, then – authors from the University of Buffalo Concussion Management Clinic have just produced a Practical Management article that promises to make your approach much more efficient when you next see a clinic patient with a sports related concussion (SRC).

The first and corresponding author of this manuscript, M Nadir Haider, M.D., is our guest on the newest CJSM blog post. Dr. Haider is affiliated with the Jacobs School of Medicine, State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo where he is an Assistant Professor of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine and the Assistant Director of Research at the University Concussion Management Clinic. Many of the readers of CJSM and listeners of the podcast will be familiar with the voluminous research that comes out of the SUNY, Buffalo center.  This work has been transformative in the area of SRCs.

Listen in on our conversation, where Dr. Haider walks us through the evidence-based exam, and then go to the September 2020 CJSM where you will find the Practical Management article itself, currently free of charge.

As always you can find the podcast on our journal website, or you may go to iTunes to listen in and subscribe as well.

Any way you read, listen or engage with CJSM, we are happy you are part of our sports medicine community.

Exercise as a prescription to address post-concussion syndrome: The CJSM Blog Journal Club

Sports like American football are taking place in the midst of COVID19 — concussions are sure to follow

Our September 2020 edition has just published, and this edition is a particularly compelling one, full of original research.  You have to check it out.

As ever our Jr. Associate Editor Jason Zaremski M.D. has just posted his newest submission to the CJSM journal club.

While COVID19 is wreaking havoc with sports schedules around the globe, there are enough high schools and youth sports programs active that concussions will continue to remain a challenge for clinicians to treat.  And post-concussion syndrome is one particularly challenging aspect to this injury.  Dr. Zaremski walks us through original research looking at an ‘exercise prescription’ to treat post-concussion syndrome.

____________________________________________________________________

Jason Zaremski MD

Gauvin-Lepage J, Friedman D, Grilli L, Sufrategui M, De Matteo C, Iverson, GL, Gagnon I. Effectiveness of an Exercise-Based Active Rehabilitation Intervention for Youth Who Are Slow to Recover After Concussion, Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: September 2020 – Volume 30 – Issue 5 – p 423-432 doi: 10.1097/JSM.0000000000000634

Introduction:  With the change of seasons, many of our readers return to covering pediatric and adolescent sport. In the Northern Hemisphere, summer vacation is over, and academics and school sports are commencing. Fall is the start of the gridiron football season and there is often a surge of concussed youth who need effective, evidence-based management.

This month the CJSM Journal Club has chosen to highlight original research on the effectiveness of exercise-based rehabilitation in 8-17 year youth who have sustained a concussion. In this age group, return to school is even more important than return to sport, and the lingering difficulties in intellectual ability, vestibular system function, memory, and/or attention can be particularly debilitating.  The authors in this new study report that between 20% and 30% of all concussed youth will endorse post-concussive symptoms (PCS) 1 month after injury. Further research into treatments and modalities aimed at reducing the frequency with which children and adolescents experience PCS is paramount.

Purpose: The authors state two aims:

1) To determine the impact of providing participants (aged 8 to 17 years) who are slow to recover after a concussion with an active rehabilitation intervention (ARI) compared to receiving standard care alone, at 2 and 6 weeks after the initiation of the ARI.

2) To investigate functional recovery 6 weeks after initiation of the ARI.

Setting: Tertiary care pediatric trauma center and associated community health care providers. Read more of this post

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