The Global Sports Medicine Community — the CJSM Summer Podcast

As I write this post, the third round of the US Open Golf tournament is taking place as is Euro2020 (a year after being suspended), and Father’s Day is about to be celebrated in the United States.  That means summer is ‘full on’ in the Northern Hemisphere.

Which also means plenty of folks are taking vacation and it has become hard to track down some authors to join me for a podcast!!!

Lemonade courtesy of Wikimedia

Mixing metaphors:  the old adage has it that you make lemonade out of lemons, and since lemonade is an unofficial drink of summer, you all get a special summer treat with this, the 49th podcast for the journal.

I am using this moment to try out a special podcast format I’ve been toying with in my head.  I’m striking out getting guests for this podcast, and so I’ll serve you up ‘me’ as a guest!

Let me know if you think I’m lemonade….or a lemon!

I’ve been an admirer of the American Journal of Sports Medicine’s ‘5 in 5’ podcast for several years.  The hosts zip through five of the manuscripts in a recent edition of AJSM in approximately five minutes.  It’s a brilliant way to get some snack bite size information and I encourage the readers of CJSM and the listeners of our podcast to check out AJSM’s podcast.

With a tip of a hat to our eminent colleagues at AJSM, I have decided to call today’s podcast “2 in 10”: Read more of this post

CJSM May 2021 Journal Club — Blood Biomarkers in Pediatric Concussions

The May 2021 CJSM issue has just published, and as always it is full of articles you will want to read.

As I gaze at the table of contents, a non-random sampling of eye catching articles includes

CJSM Junior Associate Editor Jason Zaremski, MD breaks it all down for us.

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Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine

Online Journal Club May 2021

CJSM Junior Associate Editor Jason Zaremski, MD

Jason L Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR

Anzalone AJ, et al. Blood Biomarkers of Sports-Related Concussion in Pediatric Athletes.

Introduction:  There has been a substantial amount of interest in the diagnosis, evaluation, and management sports related concussions (SRC) in the past decade. An emerging area of interest has been the study of biomarkers as a more objective measure of head trauma. Two blood biomarkers — Neurofilament light polypeptide (Nf-L), primarily found in axons, and Tau, a microtubule-associated protein necessary for axonal transport — have been studied at advanced level of sport (collegiate, professional, and Olympic athletes).

The authors of this new study evaluated these blood biomarkers in pediatric athletes.  The main outcome measures they looked at were correlations between self-reported symptom measures biomarker concentration levels.

Purpose/Specific Aims: The authors examined patterns of blood biomarker concentrations (tau and Nf-L) in pediatric athletes seen in clinic in the days following a SRC and at a six-month follow up.  A comparator group of non-injured controls were assessed as well.  Correlations between biomarker concentrations and self-reported symptom scores were assessed. Read more of this post

Youth Sports Specialization in the United States — a Podcast with Dr. Stephanie Kliethermes

The most recent annual meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM2021) was a smashing (and virtual) success.

The March 2021 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine highlights plenty of the work presented at AMSSM2021, with the publication of many of the research and case abstracts presented at the meeting.

The same issue also sees published one of the AMSSM’s most recent publications:  Defining a Research Agenda For Youth Sport Specialization in the United States:  the AMSSM Youth Early Sport Specialization Summit

The lead author of this publication, Stephanie Kliethermes, PhD, is the Director of AMSSM’s Collaborative Research Network, which has become a body which produces a considerable amount of sports medicine research.

Dr. Stephanie Kliethermes — researcher, glacier explorer

CJSM values its partnership with AMSSM. As the official journal of that society — and of Australasia’s ACSEP and Canada’s CASEM–we take a special interest in the research that emerges from these pre-eminent organizations.

And so it was a natural to reach out to Dr. Kliethermes to pick her brain on what we know — and perhaps, more importantly, what we don’t know — about the phenomenon of early youth sport specialization, rather recently identified as a significant public health problem in western societies.

Between her demanding academic schedule, her running, and her other outdoor escapades (glacier exploring it seems), she can be a difficult person to track down.  But also one who is unfailingly generous, humorous, and so very thoughtful and insightful in her interview style.

We know you will enjoy this podcast and will find the associated publication very informative.  So, take a listen and a read. You’re bound to learn a lot from Dr. Kliethermes and the AMSSM.

 

Five questions with Dr. Carlin Senter, Program Chair for #AMSSM2021

Carlin Senter, M.D., Program Chair for the 2021 Annual AMSSM Meeting

CJSM is the official journal of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), and so we are especially eager for the upcoming AMSSM Annual Meeting to be taking place virtually (meaning: you can ‘touch bases’ anywhere on the planet) 13 – 18 April, 2021.

Carlin Senter, M.D. is the Director of Primary Care Sports Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and the Program Chair for #AMSSM2021. We can only imagine how busy she is right now, with only a few weeks left before the big event.

Somehow, she found the time to let us interview her. Thank you, Dr. Senter, and ‘see’ you in a few weeks at the meeting.

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1. CJSM: Dr. Senter, you are the Program Chair for the upcoming AMSSM 2021 meeting, to be held virtually, and we know you have been very, very busy with the preparations.  What have been some of your significant challenges getting the program up and running in the middle of a pandemic?  Have there been any unforeseen opportunities that a virtual meeting has offered you and the society?

Carlin Senter, M.D. (CS): Actually chairing the Program Planning Committee was a great project for me to dig into during all of the uncertainty and challenges of 2020. I really enjoy planning CME meetings and have experience doing so, so this was a fun project for me. I love the creativity involved in planning these meetings and the way you get to shape a meeting around important themes and hot topics. Planning a meeting also forces me to keep up on all the latest literature.  The AMSSM staff is incredibly skilled and experienced planning the meeting, so their guidance has been invaluable. I also have an awesome Program Planning Committee and great mentors from AMSSM who have helped me throughout the planning process, so really it’s been an honor and very enjoyable to work on this throughout 2020-2021.

When we decided to go virtual with the meeting, we were of course disappointed not to get to be in person to see each other, and to meet and honor our national and international guest speakers in person. However the virtual format does have benefits. From an educational standpoint, attendees will have a chance to view 100% of the meeting in the comfort of their homes. If you want to attend 100% of the morning ICLs you can do so! If you want to watch both the session on Knees and Running as well as the session on Hips and Spine you can do so! If you want to attend in your PJs or on your spin bike you can do so! Those watching live will have a chance to ask questions of our speakers using the meeting app, just as if we were in person. For our society, I think a virtual meeting allows more people from around the country and around the world to attend at lower cost, saving on hotel and travel. I’m really hoping that we have a great turnout!

2. CJSM: As the official journal of AMSSM, CJSM has already published (in our March 2021 issue) the research abstracts and case podium abstracts for the meeting.  We’re looking forward to seeing those podium presentations, and we’re looking forward to many of the speakers you have invited.  What are some of the big highlights you have in store for attendees?

CS: So many highlights, where to start? Read more of this post

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