Marijuana and Athletic Performance: Help or Hindrance? The CJSM Podcast

In our newest CJSM podcast we tackle the controversial issue of marijuana in sports.

The September 2018 thematic issue, on the management of pain in athletes, includes many unique contributions to this important body of literature.  Indeed, it almost goes without saying that almost all patients I see in my clinic on a daily basis have, as part of their presenting condition, a complaint of pain.  I suspect this is true for you, too. Pain management is one of the most common issues we deal with as sports medicine clinicians.

One of those newly published studies is Cannabis and the health and performance of the elite athlete — it is an excellent discussion about many dimensions of this drug and its varied uses among elite athletes.  Among the conclusions the authors make: “The potential beneficial effects of cannabis as part of a pain management protocol, including reducing concussion-related symptoms, deserve further attention.”

A logical question, when considering use of this drug in the athlete, might be:  what are the potential negative side effects?  Or, for that matter, are there ergogenic effects with which we must be concerned?

In our July 2018 journal, a group of authors tackled these issues in a systematic review on marijuana and its effects on athletic performance.

Mr. Dion Diep, McMaster University

The corresponding author of the study, Dion Diep, is a medical student at McMaster University in Hamilton University.  He was able to join us for a podcast discussion of what his team found.  Mr. Diep is our first medical student guest on the podcast, and based on his erudite performance I would say he has a stellar career ahead, as a clinician and a researcher.

We cover a lot of ground in a short time in this podcast.  Can marijuana enhance athletic performance?  What negative effects does it have?  May it show promise as a targeted treatment of various athletic maladies, such as anxiety?  What is the rational for having marijuana on the WADA banned substances list?

As ever you can find this podcast, and all our podcasts, on our journal website as well as iTunes, where you are invited to subscribe to the podcast and ensure you get direct delivery of every new edition of this growing audio library.

When you’re done listening to the podcast and reading the studies, take the time to take the poll and consider leaving a comment here on the blog or on the iTunes link. We’re always looking to hear from you — your contribution to the global conversation on clinical sports medicine is invaluable, and your feedback will help us continuously improve what we share with you.

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Marijuana and Its Effects on Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review

Cannabis and the Health and Performance of the Elite Athlete

 

CJSM Podcast: Dr. David Howell looks at pediatric concussions

One of the top young guns in the world of pediatric sports medicine research is David Howell, PhD, ATC of Children’s Hospital Colorado, and the University of Colorado School of Medicine.  Dr. Howell has graced the pages of the CJSM blog before and, even more notably, the pages of the journal itself many times.  He has been one of CJSM’s more prolific authors over the last few years.

When we recently published several of his articles within a span of months, I knew it was time to reach out and get him on the podcast.

Listeners will not be disappointed — Dr. Howell is as erudite and lucid a speaker as he is a writer.  Together in this, our newest podcast, he and I discuss “Breaking research developments in pediatric and adolescent concussions.”  We were able to focus on three of his most recent studies published in CJSM:

Dr. Howell’s work continues to fill a significant research gap noted by the Berlin consensus statement on concussion group — the relative lack of evidence for how to diagnose and manage concussions in the under 13 year old crowd.  Not surprisingly, several of these new CJSM studies have received a lot of buzz, most especially the first study in that litany (on Concussion symptom profiles).  As someone who sees concussions in this age group on a nearly daily basis, I have found the results of this published research to be, already, of significant practical use.  The Altmetrics on the paper underscore the importance of the work.

This newest podcast can be found with all of our podcasts here on the CJSM website and here on iTunes  And don’t forget you can subscribe to our podcasts on iTunes so you never miss one.

Thank you, again, Dr. Howell for the continued work you do in the field of sport medicine at large, and in the area of pediatric sport-related concussion in particular.

CJSM podcast with Chris Nowinski: What FIFA might consider doing differently in 2022

It was a whirlwind of a month that just ended:  World Cup 2018 has been rightfully celebrated as a wonderfully exciting display of sport.  Media outlets around the globe are reflecting on the highs and lows of the tournament. 

One of my favorite comments was a tweet conversation involving former English professional footballer Gary Lineker:  “Back to politics now, eh?/ What a depressing thought.’ 

Politics. Ugh.

Twitter was also the media where I read some of the most insightful commentary on the various concussion controversies that occurred this tournament, and Chris Nowisnki, Ph.D. was among the most prolific and penetrating in his analyses of the injuries to Matuidi and others.

Dr. Chris Nowinski of the Concussion Legacy Foundation

Dr. Nowinski will be a familiar figure to anyone involved in the management of sport-related concussions. Dr. Nowinski is the CEO and co-founder of the Concussion Legacy Foundation and a co-founder of the Boston University CTE center. He has been a guest on the CJSM podcast previously.

He was the perfect analyst to review what sport still gets wrong about concussions in 2018, and to review the directions where we all might consider going as we turn toward FIFA 2022 in Qatar.

Go to our podcast link on the CJSM website or on iTunes — listen to what Dr. Nowinski has to say, and then let us know what you think.

 

Prof. Martin Schwellnus dishes on exercise associated muscle cramping: The CJSM podcast

A panel of experts & contributors to CJSM — Profs. Martin Schwellnus, Stavros Kavouras, Tamara Hew, William Roberts (L to R). ACSM Denver 2017

Exercise Associated Muscle Cramping (EAMC) is the subject of several studies CJSM has published over the last several years.  It is a notorious problem for athletes and for their caregivers.

A world expert on the subject, Professor Martin Schwellnus MBBCh, MSc(Med), MD, FACSM has joined us on the CJSM podcast to discuss his newest contribution to the medical literature in this field.

Dr. Schwellnus is a Professor of Sport and Exercise Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria and Director: Sport, Exercise Medicine and Lifestyle Institute (SEMLI), University of Pretoria
Director: International Olympic Committee (IOC) Research Centre, South Africa.  I count myself fortunate to consider him a good friend as well — someone I look forward to seeing at conferences such as ACSM or IOC injury prevention.

You can find our podcast conversation at the top of the growing list of CJSM podcasts on our journal website. You can also subscribe to all of the CJSM podcasts on iTunes here.

I praise Prof. Schwellnus for being such a lucid and erudite speaker in this podcast.  And it’s true!!!  You will definitely get a sense of that when you listen to the podcast.  Should you want to hear him yourself delivering a proper lecture, you can, thanks to the glories of social media:  check out this lecture on YouTube on the drug everyone should take!!!!*

*[steady there:  this is sport and EXERCISE medicine 😉  We’ll reserve a discussion about medical marijuana for an upcoming blog post]

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