Youth Sports Safety in the United States — a Podcast with Dr. Stephanie Kliethermes

The most recent annual meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM2021) was a smashing (and virtual) success.

The March 2021 Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine highlights plenty of the work presented at AMSSM2021, with the publication of many of the research and case abstracts presented at the meeting.

The same issue also sees published one of the AMSSM’s most recent publications:  Defining a Research Agenda For Youth Sport Specialization in the United States:  the AMSSM Youth Early Sport Specialization Summit

The lead author of this publication, Stephanie Kliethermes, PhD, is the Director of AMSSM’s Collaborative Research Network, which has become a body which produces a considerable amount of sports medicine research.

Dr. Stephanie Kliethermes — researcher, glacier explorer

CJSM values its partnership with AMSSM. As the official journal of that society — and of Australasia’s ACSEP and Canada’s CASEM–we take a special interest in the research that emerges from these pre-eminent organizations.

And so it was a natural to reach out to Dr. Kliethermes to pick her brain on what we know — and perhaps, more importantly, what we don’t know — about the phenomenon of early youth sport specialization, rather recently identified as a significant public health problem in western societies.

Between her demanding academic schedule, her running, and her other outdoor escapades (glacier exploring it seems), she can be a difficult person to track down.  But also one who is unfailingly generous, humorous, and so very thoughtful and insightful in her interview style.

We know you will enjoy this podcast and will find the associated publication very informative.  So, take a listen and a read. You’re bound to learn a lot from Dr. Kliethermes and the AMSSM.

 

Five questions with Dr. Carlin Senter, Program Chair for #AMSSM2021

Carlin Senter, M.D., Program Chair for the 2021 Annual AMSSM Meeting

CJSM is the official journal of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), and so we are especially eager for the upcoming AMSSM Annual Meeting to be taking place virtually (meaning: you can ‘touch bases’ anywhere on the planet) 13 – 18 April, 2021.

Carlin Senter, M.D. is the Director of Primary Care Sports Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and the Program Chair for #AMSSM2021. We can only imagine how busy she is right now, with only a few weeks left before the big event.

Somehow, she found the time to let us interview her. Thank you, Dr. Senter, and ‘see’ you in a few weeks at the meeting.

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1. CJSM: Dr. Senter, you are the Program Chair for the upcoming AMSSM 2021 meeting, to be held virtually, and we know you have been very, very busy with the preparations.  What have been some of your significant challenges getting the program up and running in the middle of a pandemic?  Have there been any unforeseen opportunities that a virtual meeting has offered you and the society?

Carlin Senter, M.D. (CS): Actually chairing the Program Planning Committee was a great project for me to dig into during all of the uncertainty and challenges of 2020. I really enjoy planning CME meetings and have experience doing so, so this was a fun project for me. I love the creativity involved in planning these meetings and the way you get to shape a meeting around important themes and hot topics. Planning a meeting also forces me to keep up on all the latest literature.  The AMSSM staff is incredibly skilled and experienced planning the meeting, so their guidance has been invaluable. I also have an awesome Program Planning Committee and great mentors from AMSSM who have helped me throughout the planning process, so really it’s been an honor and very enjoyable to work on this throughout 2020-2021.

When we decided to go virtual with the meeting, we were of course disappointed not to get to be in person to see each other, and to meet and honor our national and international guest speakers in person. However the virtual format does have benefits. From an educational standpoint, attendees will have a chance to view 100% of the meeting in the comfort of their homes. If you want to attend 100% of the morning ICLs you can do so! If you want to watch both the session on Knees and Running as well as the session on Hips and Spine you can do so! If you want to attend in your PJs or on your spin bike you can do so! Those watching live will have a chance to ask questions of our speakers using the meeting app, just as if we were in person. For our society, I think a virtual meeting allows more people from around the country and around the world to attend at lower cost, saving on hotel and travel. I’m really hoping that we have a great turnout!

2. CJSM: As the official journal of AMSSM, CJSM has already published (in our March 2021 issue) the research abstracts and case podium abstracts for the meeting.  We’re looking forward to seeing those podium presentations, and we’re looking forward to many of the speakers you have invited.  What are some of the big highlights you have in store for attendees?

CS: So many highlights, where to start? Read more of this post

Sports Medicine from South Africa — SASMA biennial congress begins this week!

Dr. Pierre Viviers, President of SASMA

It’s been a while since we have invited a sports medicine colleague to a “Five Questions with CJSM” interview.

What better time to catch up with the current President of the South African Medical Association (SASMA) than on the eve of SASMA’s biennial Congress?

My dear friend Dr. Pierre Viviers of Stellenbosch University is a very busy man right now as he places the final touches on what is sure to be one of the premier events of this year’s sports medicine calendar.  Having attended SASMA in 2015  in Johannesburg, I can attest to what an exciting and stimulating event this Congress is.

True to form, Dr. Viviers did not hesitate to volunteer for this interview when I reached out to him, despite his busy schedule.  I hope you enjoy our conversation and that it whets your appetite for what is coming later this week from Cape Town.  If you can’t be there, be sure to follow #SASMA2019 on social media.

And now….Dr. Viviers!

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  1. CJSM: The biennial Congress of SASMA is taking place 10 – 13 October 2019 in Cape Town, the “Mother City.” It is a joint Congress with SASMA and BRICSCESS.  Can you tell us about what you see as the highlights of the program, and for the readers unfamiliar with BRICSCESS can you tell us about that organization?

Pierre Viviers (PV): It is a joint congress which also includes the 6th Annual Congress on Medicine and Science in Ultra-Endurance Sport which will definitely be a highlight. The pre-congress workshops are always popular and well attended. This will include 2 full-day workshops presented by ‘Exercise is Medicine South Africa” (EIM SA) and SAIDS (SA Institute for Drug-free Sport), as well as a half-day workshop by the S.A Sport-Physiotherapy group.

A highlight for me personally, is the integrated participation between scientists and medical professionals throughout the program.

Opening the narrative of social justice and the role which sport can play, especially in a country like S.A, will be one of our most influential South Africans, Prof Thuli Madonsela, activist for social justice and human rights, previous public protector and advocate in the High Court of S.A.  This is definitely a session not to be missed.

The prestigious Noble lecture will be presented by a good friend and colleague, Cheri Blauwet from Harvard Medical School & Spaulding Rehab Hospital, Boston. Cheri’s journey in injury and illness prevention in the elite Paralympic athlete will be a certain highlight. A symposium later in the conference will be another highlight, focusing on “innovations in athletes with disability.”

The sport nutrition colloquium led by Louise Burke (Australia) and other prominent South Africans in the field is another highlight.

The featured science session on player welfare in rugby union as well as the featured clinical symposium on Sport Related Concussion will reveal interesting concepts in injury prevention and management in this popular South African collision sport.

The session on mental health in athletes presented by two leaders in the field will also give new insight in prevalent mental health issues which may influence athlete welfare and performance.

The BRICES countries are Brasilia, Russia, India, China and South Africa and BRICSCESS is the Council of Exercise and Sport Science founded to specifically look into health and wellness of people within these counties. However, this is there second international congress. The council also strives to bring communication together between the BRICS countries on issues influencing health and wellness through universities and other platforms. The Council is also dedicated to leadership development in young scientists within the field.

 

  1. CJSM: You are winding down your term as President of SASMA. What are the fondest memories of your past two years of service?  Who is the incoming President?

Read more of this post

Five Questions with Dr. Nick Peirce: The Role of Physical Activity and Sport in Mental Health

Dr. Nick Peirce, lead on the FSEM team producing recent exercise and mental health position statement.

Reduce depression and cognitive decline by up to 30% with regular exercise?  Can this be so?

For those of us ‘in the know’ in this field of sport and exercise medicine, that statement may seem understood.  But medical research translating to broadly held knowledge which then may lead to meaningful change:  well, we ALL know how rare that situation can be.  The management of recent concussion events in the FIFA World Cup reminds us of the difficulty of knowledge translation: there were instances where it seemed as if we were ‘partying like it’s 1999’ so to speak.

Reviews of the current state of evidence-based knowledge about medically important findings continue to be of vital importance in ‘getting the word out’.  In that spirit, we couldn’t be happier to see the recent position statement released by one of our partner societies, the Faculty of Sport and Exercise Medicine (UK) : The Role of Physical Activity and Sport in Mental Health.

The lead on the team of authors which produced this FSEM UK Position Statement is Dr. Nick Peirce, Chief Medical Officer of the England and Wales Cricket Board.  We wanted to pick his brain to get a bit more of the background work which resulted in this statement.  The summer Cricket season has kept Dr. Peirce occupied above and beyond his usual level of busyness.  During a gap between competitions, CJSM caught up with him — the results of our interview can be found here.

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1. CJSM: We want to discuss the new FSEM statement on the role of physical activity and sport in mental health, but first can you tell us a bit about yourself: your background as a sports medicine clinician and your involvement with FSEM?

NP: I have been involved in Sports and Exercise medicine for over 20 years having worked across a large number of Olympic and Professional sports, including Leading Sports Medicine for English Institute of Sport (EIS) at the busiest site in the country at Loughborough University, the Davis Cup team and the football team Nottingham Forest. I am a Hospital Consultant in Sport and Exercise Medicine in the NHS and have been Chief Medical Officer for the England Cricket for the more than 10 years. I have been involved in many of the Sports Societies and for 3 years have sat on the Faculty (FSEM), although professional sport commitments make this challenging.

2. CJSM: How did you become involved with this particular FSEM project on mental health – was there a large team involved in the production of this project? Was FSEM the only organization involved in the drafting of this document? Read more of this post

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