Hot child in the city

tami

Tamara Hew-Butler on TruTV’s “Adam Ruins Everything”

My topic for today is not that glorious piece of 70’s bubble gum pop from Nick Gilder — no, it is a topic much more directly related to sports medicine.

It’s August and it is hot indeed, with a day here in Ohio set to be one of those classic 90/90 days (>90 F and > 90% humidity).  And it’s the first day of high school Friday night football, with middle school and Pop Warner following this weekend.   These are days we need to do all we can to prevent exertional heat illness (EHI), most especially in our children and adolescents.

In our zeal to prevent EHI, we must be careful not to overhydrate.  A year ago CJSM published the Third International Consensus Statement on Exercise Associated Hyponatremia and followed this up with a blog post and a podcast where we discussed the risks of overhydration with lead author, Tamara Hew-Butler.

The hashtag that came out of those discussions — #Drink2Thirst — spread over social media last year.  The concept is an important one, and one which remains controversial.  There are still many proponents of mandatory water breaks, or of drinking to a certain color of urine.  Others argue that while both are potentially life-threatening, the risk of EHI outweighs the risks of the much rarer condition of EAH — better to err on the side of overhydration they say.  On the other side, some note that hydration is pushed on athletes as something of a panacea, touted as helping to prevent exercise associated muscle cramping (EAMC) when the science argues against that concept.

Now, Adam Ruins Everything, on TruTV, has weighed in on the issue of overhydration in sports, with hilarious effect. And I see Adam has recruited Dr. Hew-Butler herself to debunk some of the hydration mythology and spread the mantra of #Drink2Thirst

Watch the video, and laugh.  Then check out some of the links in this post that will take you to the consensus statement and podcast and you’ll get more of the hard science from Dr. Hew-Butler.  It might change your thinking, and you may start translating some of this science to how you approach the athletes you manage.

Stay cool out there and #Drink2Thirst!

Midsummer

mo and me beaver island

The joys of summer!

July 4th is in the rear-view mirror, and for those of in the USA, that means the glass is half empty (or full): summer has hit the halfway mark.

In many respects, in the sports medicine world we’re well past the halfway point, because August two-a-days and hitting in football begin, at least here in Ohio, precisely four weeks from today.  Then the ‘busy season’ begins.

But we still have July to enjoy – in a slightly more leisurely fashion – such offerings as Wimbledon, the Open golf championship at St. Andrews, and, of course, the new issue of CJSM: Volume 25, issue #4 was published one week ago.

Do check this out, as there are several significant offerings on board this issue.  First and foremost is the publication of the statement from the 3rd International Exercise-associated Hyponatremia (EAH) Consensus Development Conference. This statement has been gathering a lot of buzz in the mainstream and social media, as has the accompanying editorial written by Dr. Mitchell Rosner of the Univ. of Virginia.   The Washington Post published a good review of the statement’s published findings, for instance, and the message to “Drink To Thirst” and avoid overhydration is making its way over various media channels…..including iTunes!  If you haven’t checked out the podcast conversation I had with the statement’s lead author, Dr. Tami Hew, by all means listen in here.

There is, as ever, some exciting original research in this issue as well, including a study of the incidence of EAH in ultramarathoners: in work coming out of Australia, a 2% incidence of EAH was found in ultramarathoners competing in the Cradle Mountain Run in Tasmania, Australia.  And so……EAH may be seeing us more than we are seeing it!!!!

Another very exciting study in this month’s journal is a high quality (Level 1), randomized clinical trial comparing various techniques of ACL reconstruction, with patient-reported and clinical outcomes with 2+ years of follow-up. This is fabulous stuff–no spoiler alert here, as the offering is currently FREE – and so click on that link and read the study yourself to see what differences there may be between double bundle, patellar tendon, and hamstring tendon grafts.

Whether you’re by the pool, a lake, the ocean….or you’re in clinic (as some of us must still be!)–enjoy your summer, and enjoy the July 2015 CJSM.

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