Five Questions with Dr. Hamish Osborne — the Surfer’s Paradise Edition

Familiar faces to CJSM readers! (L to R): Bob Sallis, Peter Brukner, Hamish Osborne, Connie Lebrun

We have on deck today our intrepid Associate Editor Hamish Osborne.  Dr. Osborne, of the University of Otago, Dunedin, NZ, is a member of the Australasian College of Sport and Exercise Physicians (ACSEP), one of our affiliate societies.

Over the last few years, he has pulled the “hard” duty of reporting from the beaches of Queensland, Australia on the proceedings of the annual ACSEP meeting. He’s here to tell us what we missed at Surfer’s Paradise and, just as importantly, what we can anticipate in Queenstown, NZ, site of the 2019 ACSEP meeting 6 – 10 February 2019.

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1) CJSM: The 2018 ACSEP has just wrapped. Let’s start things off the way we might with a patient in an exam room – with a big, broad open question. And so: what were some of the more memorable presentations from the proceedings?

Dr. Osborne: I really enjoyed hearing from Prof Lorimer Mosely. The study of pain translated so that mere mortals like me can make sense/use of it. I’ve recently extended my first consultation with patients mostly so that I can spend 15 minutes with them undoing bad images/poor language they use/ have in their heads,  much of it having been learned from us, the professionals treating them.

They come in with a “stuffed back” and leaving knowing they are not injured, just sore and that that soreness is a danger sign of trouble coping with load rather than damage happening. If only we could get “Lorimer” into our undergraduate courses and teach the new generations about this. We don’t have the problem of pain being a vital sign in Australasia but we still have some work to do.

“Ah, but I was so much older then. I’m younger than that now.” At Lake Tekapo, NZ

And then there is your old mate, Dr. Kathryn Ackerman from Boston Children’s Hospital, Sports Medicine – what doesn’t she know about RED-S?  Awesome keynote talks from her, and funny.

By the way Jim her photo from 8 years hasn’t changed as much as your recently tweeted photo (see right) from 8 years ago in New Zealand – perhaps you can come to our 2019 ACSEP conference in Queenstown and update that one with another great set of mountains in the background.

2) CJSM: I followed the meeting via Twitter and the #ACSEP18 hashtag, and was heavily reliant on your prolific tweeting.  The ACSEP does fantastic work all around; one of the more interesting programs it has pioneered is the Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP).  What is the RAP

Dr. Osborne: The ACSEP is very proud of its reconciliation action plan. It is a written practical action plan outlining how ACSEP will build relationships with, and respect and opportunities for, the indigenous peoples of Australia.

There is unfortunately a gap between traditional custodians of the land – Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples – and non-Indigneous Australians, particularly in health standards. Read more of this post

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