Alphabet Soup: Concussion Assessment in Youth

alphabet soup 1

Chicken soup: good for the soul….good for concussion? Photo: strawberryblues Wikimedia

SCAT2, SCAT3, Child-SCAT 3, SAC, BESS…….as those of us in sports medicine know, concussion assessments have become an alphabet soup!

Our July 2015 edition of CJSM contains an interesting study looking at baseline SCAT2 assessments of healthy youth student-athletes; it also included some preliminary evidence for the use of the Child-SCAT3 in children younger than 13.

The 4th International Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport introduced the SCAT3 and Child-SCAT3 instruments.  The Child-SCAT3, in particular, was a significant advancement as there had been no pre-existing instrument for pediatric concussion assessments prior to the 2012 Zurich conference.  If you have not ever looked the Child-SCAT3 over, take the chance now by going to the freely available consensus statement–the Child-SCAT3 PDF is readily downloadable.  Among the differences between the SCAT3 and Child-SCAT3:  a different set of Maddocks questions (is it before or after lunch?); days of the week (as opposed to months of the year) in reverse order; a parent- as well as a self-assessment of symptoms (and the self-assessment is written in more age appropriate language).

Throughout the year, but especially at this time of year (late summer–football has begun) we do assessments like this for the large number of kids we see with concussions or suspected concussions.   Read more of this post

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