CJSM Blog Journal Club — NMT to prevent ankle sprains in youth soccer and basketball athletes

Our Jr. Assoc Editor Dr Zaremski — already awarded an AMSSM Travelling Fellowship. Is there something bigger in his future?

It’s July, and our fourth edition of 2018 has just published.  One of the headlining pieces of original research we have in this edition is new work from the Sport Injury Prevention Centre in Calgary, Alberta Canada (chaired by Caroline Emery, the well-known researcher and author): Prevention of Ankle Sprain Injuries in Youth Soccer Cland Basketball: Effectiveness of a Neuromuscular Training Program

Our Jr. Assoc. Editor Jason L Zaremski, MD  is today reprising his role as guest author for the CJSM blog journal club  and will take us through his read of the study.  Join in the conversation over this important new, original research by reading the article, the journal club post below, and sharing your thoughts in the ‘reply’ section below this post, or on Twitter at @cjsmonline 

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Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Blog Journal Club

Jason L Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR

Title: Owoeye OBA, Palacios-Derflingher LM, Emery CA. Prevention of Ankle Sprain Injuries in Youth Soccer and Basketball: Effectiveness of a Neuromuscular Training Program and Examining Risk Factors.

Introduction:  The summer Journal Club commentary for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine will be an analysis of the new research examining the effects of injury reduction of ankle sprains in soccer and basketball using neuromuscular training (NMT) program in youth athletes. The secondary objective of this study included the evaluation of risk factors for Ankle Sprain Injury (ASI).

Methods:  This study was a secondary data analysis from 3 cohort studies and 2 randomized control trials (RCTs) over the course of 1 season of player in soccer and basketball from 2005-2011. There were a total of 2265 patients aged 11-18 years that play soccer and basketball in Alberta, Canada. Player characteristics (sex, age, weight, height, BMI, sport exposure time, previous ASI, previous lower extremity injury with and without ASI) were divided based upon if a player participated in a NMT program or did not. Frequency between all variables was very similar except for No NMT between females (n=952) and males (n=439) and sport participation without exposure to NMT (soccer = 965, basketball = 426). Average age, weight, height, and BMI were all similar. Exposure time for the NMT group was 72.56 (70.98-74.15) hours versus 62.92 (61.48-64.37) hours for No NMT group.

Secondary Data Analysis Studies: Read more of this post

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CJSM Blog Journal Club — is Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound an Effective Treatment in Spondylolysis?

Spondylolysis in the adolescent athlete — what to do?

Symptomatic isthmic spondylolysis in the adolescent athlete — for many of us in the world of primary care sports medicine who have a large pediatric/adolescent patient base, this is one of the more common clinical entities we treat.

I’ve written previously about some of the controversies surrounding this condition, and I have had the pleasure of seeing some of the spondylolysis research I’ve conducted published in the pages of CJSM.

Recently published “On Line first” in CJSM is research coming from a Japanese center renowned for its work in this area:  Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS)for Early-stage Lumbar Spondylolysis in Young Athletes.

I’m delighted to introduce again our Junior Associate Editor, Jason Zaremski, M.D., who is pioneering our on-line CJSM journal club.  He’ll take us through this new study and help us decide:  LIPUS — should we be using it in our clinical practice when treating an adolescent-athlete with early-stage, or ‘acute,’ isthmic spondylolysis?

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Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine

Online Journal Club

Jason Zaremski, M.D.

Jason L Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR

Title: Tsukada M, Takiuchi T, and Watanabe K. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound for Early-Stage Lumbar Spondylolysis in Young Athletes. Clin J Sport Med. Published Ahead of Print October 10, 2017. doi: 10.1097/JSM.0000000000000531.

Introduction:

The spring Journal Club commentary for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine will be a review of new research examining the effects of pulsed ultrasound for early-stage lumbar spondylolysis in young athletes. This is a retrospective case control therapeutic study with level three evidence. The specific aims of the study were 1) to determine differences in median time to return to previous sports activity with and without the use of low intensity pulses ultrasound (LIPUS); and 2) to determine if healing rates are improved with LIPUS. Read more of this post

CJSM Blog Journal Club — is rESWT an effective therapy for chronic, distal biceps tendinopathy?

I’m pleased to welcome Jason Zaremski MD, one of our junior associate editors, who has contributed our first on-line journal club article.

Dr. Zaremski is a primary care sports medicine specialist who is board certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. He is an assistant professor at the University of Florida in the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation.

Dr. Zaremski is also a member of one of our affiliated societies, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, and was appointed last year as the AMSSM junior associate editor.  He’s been busy behind the scenes on many CJSM initiatives already; this is his first foray onto the blog, and we’ve been looking forward to his contribution.  Enjoy!

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Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine

Online Journal Club

Jason L Zaremski

Title: Furia JP, et al. Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Is Effective and Safe in Chronic Distal Biceps Tendinopathy. Clin J Sport Med 2017;27:430–437.

Introduction:

This is the first online Journal Club Commentary for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine’s new initiative for its Online Journal Club. Furia and colleagues sought to determine the efficacy and safety of radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) for chronic distal biceps tendinopathy (cDBT). This is a retrospective case control study with level three evidence. The specific aim of the study is to determine whether rESWT is safe and effective for the management of cDBT.

Methods:

This is a retrospective case control study Read more of this post

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