CJSM Blog Journal Club — is Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound an Effective Treatment in Spondylolysis?

Spondylolysis in the adolescent athlete — what to do?

Symptomatic isthmic spondylolysis in the adolescent athlete — for many of us in the world of primary care sports medicine who have a large pediatric/adolescent patient base, this is one of the more common clinical entities we treat.

I’ve written previously about some of the controversies surrounding this condition, and I have had the pleasure of seeing some of the spondylolysis research I’ve conducted published in the pages of CJSM.

Recently published “On Line first” in CJSM is research coming from a Japanese center renowned for its work in this area:  Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS)for Early-stage Lumbar Spondylolysis in Young Athletes.

I’m delighted to introduce again our Junior Associate Editor, Jason Zaremski, M.D., who is pioneering our on-line CJSM journal club.  He’ll take us through this new study and help us decide:  LIPUS — should we be using it in our clinical practice when treating an adolescent-athlete with early-stage, or ‘acute,’ isthmic spondylolysis?


Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine

Online Journal Club

Jason Zaremski, M.D.

Jason L Zaremski, MD, CAQSM, FACSM, FAAPMR

Title: Tsukada M, Takiuchi T, and Watanabe K. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound for Early-Stage Lumbar Spondylolysis in Young Athletes. Clin J Sport Med. Published Ahead of Print October 10, 2017. doi: 10.1097/JSM.0000000000000531.


The spring Journal Club commentary for the Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine will be a review of new research examining the effects of pulsed ultrasound for early-stage lumbar spondylolysis in young athletes. This is a retrospective case control therapeutic study with level three evidence. The specific aims of the study were 1) to determine differences in median time to return to previous sports activity with and without the use of low intensity pulses ultrasound (LIPUS); and 2) to determine if healing rates are improved with LIPUS. Read more of this post


In the Press

buttons 2

Our Main Website is a treasure trove of information: radio buttons often highlight associated characteristics of individual studies

The Atlantic, a highly-regarded monthly magazine published in the United States, recently published an article entitled “The Genetics of Being Injury Prone.”  It has garnered a lot of buzz on social media.

The study chiefly referenced in the article was recently published in our January 2015 CJSM:  “The Dawning Age for Genetic Testing in Sports.”  I found the same study–the lead study for the January CJSM–to be so important to disseminate that I blogged about it a month ago, and am reblogging that post (see below) so the study and the concept get the attention they deserve.

The Atlantic article went on to cite another CJSM study from 2013, as well:  Collagen Genes and Exercise-Associated Muscle Cramping, which I commend to you as well.

Enjoy the studies, the blog posts, the Atlantic article.  And take the time to head to our main website at cjsportmed.com, a treasure trove of information:  studies, polls, podcasts……An interesting feature of the site are the ‘buttons’ next to published studies that may be ‘inthe news,’ ‘open access,’ ‘free,’ or have other media associated with them–blog posts, podcasts, and the like (see above image).

Have a great weekend.

Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine Blog

The recent NFC championship game proved, I think, this truth: a true champion is not dead until the final whistle blows. The Seahawks  won in dramatic fashion over the Packers, my favorite team.  As many commentators noted, Seattle played horribly for 58 minutes, but were stellar for the last two; and that was all that mattered in the end.

As a fan, my initial reaction is to think “we gave it away.”  But that is a disservice to the champions.  The Seahawks never lay down, and they seized the moment when it presented itself.

Still…..as a fan, I wonder–if Aaron Rodgers’ calf were 100%, would we have pulled away more decisively earlier in the game?  The field goals in the red zone: would they have been touchdowns instead if our quarterback had his usual mobility?

Bdna_cropped Does Rodgers carry a valuable SNP in the genes of his gastrocnemius? I…

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Sports Ultrasound and the New Year


Chillin’ like Bob Dylan: Folly Beach, Charleston, S.C.

Happy New Year y’all!

Returning from lovely Charleston, South Carolina after a relaxing week, I’ll be able to retain a southern, laid-back lilt to my voice for perhaps a day or two more….As many of you would likely agree, there’s nothing quite as bracing as the need to attend to the post-vacation crunch of full email accounts, urgent work-inbox tasks, and full clinic days!

It certainly makes a difference to return to a job and profession one loves.  Sports medicine:  what would I do without you?

I hope you have had a chance to peruse the new, January 2015 CJSM, which is as full of excellent articles as the aforementioned inboxes.  One of the highlights of the issue is the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine Position Statement on Interventional Radiology, which is currently freely available.  I hope, too, you’ve had a chance to catch the new podcast interview with Dr. Jonathan Finnoff, the lead author of the paper.

As a clinician who currently (and regretfully) does not employ sports ultrasound in my current practice, I’m always curious about those professional colleagues who do.  With that in mind, it’s time for the first poll of the year:

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.


CJSM Podcast 6: Sports Ultrasound

jsm-podcast-bg-1With the New Year, we have a new issue, and the January 2015 CJSM is packed with interesting new research.

Among the many articles you’ll want to check out are two relating to sports ultrasound: the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) Position Statement on Interventional Ultrasound in Sports Medicine and the AMSSM Recommended Sports Ultrasound Curriculum for Sports Medicine Fellowships.

Our first podcast of the year is a conversation with the lead author of these two papers, Jonathan Finnoff, D.O. of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center.

Take a listen and tell us what  you think!  And Happy New Year!

(and to listen to and download all of our podcasts from iTunes go here).

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